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Last Updated on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 452

Prejudice saves us a painful trouble, the trouble of thinking.

The quote above is in reference to Rabbi Alfred Bettleheim. Throughout the book, Ruth Bader Ginsburg reflects on the impacts of prejudice in her own life and her methods for overcoming it. She ultimately concludes that prejudice has no basis...

(The entire section contains 452 words.)

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Prejudice saves us a painful trouble, the trouble of thinking.

The quote above is in reference to Rabbi Alfred Bettleheim. Throughout the book, Ruth Bader Ginsburg reflects on the impacts of prejudice in her own life and her methods for overcoming it. She ultimately concludes that prejudice has no basis in fact—as a lawyer, this particularly bothers her. She dedicates her career to ending bias through legal reform.

Feminism . . . I think the simplest explanation [is] free to be, if you were a girl-doctor, lawyer, Indian chief. Anything you want to be. And if you're a boy, and you like teaching, you like nursing, you would like to have a doll, that's OK too. That notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they many be, and not be held back by artificial barriers- manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.

The quote above gives the reader a glimpse into Justice Ginsburg's advocacy for gender equality and her personal beliefs on the topic. Justice Ginsburg displays a passion for the promotion of gender and sex equality in the United States. Here, we can see her belief that feminism is a basic human right of freedom. She also discusses her belief that you can make your own destiny. She says that your destiny is not handed to you.

When a thoughtless or unkind work is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one's ability to persuade.

Justice Ginsburg writes about the personal virtue of patience as an integral part of influence. She attributes this particular personal virtue to her journey from law school to the Supreme Court, both of which were male-dominated areas. She provides numerous examples of the bias she encountered on her journey to the Supreme Court. The above quote outlines her strategy for overcoming bias.

[Nabokov] changed the way I read and the way I write. Words could paint pictures . . . choosing the right word, and the right word order . . . could make an enormous difference in conveying an image or an idea.

Justice Ginsburg reflects on the influence of Vladimir Nabokov, a European literature professor at Cornell University.

As women achieve power, the barriers [first steps in getting power] will fall. As society sees what women can do, as women see what women can do, there will be more women out there doing things, and we'll all be better off for it.

The quote above is another example of Justice Ginsburg's personal opinions on feminism and gender equality. Even at a young age, Ruth challenged conventional views on gender norms:

I remember envying the boys long before I even knew the word feminism, because I liked shop better than cooking or sewing.

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