Max Frisch Additional Biography

Biography

(Critical Edition of Dramatic Literature)

Max Frisch was born in Zurich on May 15, 1911, the son of a self-made architect. After attending gymnasium in Zurich between 1924 and 1930, he began studying German literature at the university of Zurich in 1931, at which time he also heard lectures on art history, philosophy, law, and theology. When his father died in 1933, Frisch had to leave the university to earn a living. He became a freelance journalist and wrote for such newspapers as the Neue Zürcher Zeitung. In 1933, Frisch traveled to Prague, Budapest, Dalmatia, Istanbul, and Greece, experiences that he used in his first novel, Jürg Reinhart (1934). In 1936, thanks to the financial support of a friend, Frisch began studying architecture at the Institute of Technology in Zurich; he was awarded his diploma in 1941. Between 1939 and 1945, Frisch had to serve periodically in the Swiss army. In 1942, Frisch opened his own architect’s office in Zurich. The highlight of his architectural career was winning a competition to build an open-air swimming pool in the Zurich suburb of Letzigraben, a project that was completed in 1949. In 1948, Frisch became acquainted with Bertolt Brecht, whose theories were to have an important impact on his dramas. Frisch, an inveterate traveler, wrote in Tagebuch, 1946-1949 (1950; Sketchbook, 1946-1949, 1977) that a man travels for two reasons: to meet people who do not think that they know him once and for all, and to experience once again what is possible in life. Frisch traveled extensively in Europe and the United States and visited the Middle East, Mexico, Cuba, the Soviet Union, Japan, and China. His experiences in the United States were reflected especially in the novels I’m Not Stiller and Homo Faber (1957), and in the novella Montauk (1975). After 1954, when he gave up his architect’s office, Frisch earned his living as a writer. After living in Rome between 1960 and 1965, Frisch returned to live in Tessin, Switzerland.

Biography

(Survey of Novels and Novellas)

Max Rudolf Frisch was born in Zurich, Switzerland, on May 15, 1911, the son of a self-taught architect. After attending secondary school in Zurich between 1924 and 1930, he began studying German literature at the University of Zurich in 1931, at which time he also heard lectures on art history, philosophy, law, and theology.

When his father died in 1933, Frisch had to leave the university to earn a living. He became a freelance journalist and wrote for such newspapers as the Neue Züricher Zeitung. In 1933, Frisch traveled to Prague, Budapest, Dalmatia, Istanbul, and Greece, experiences that he used in his first novel, Jürg Reinhart, which was published in 1934. In 1936, thanks to the financial support of a friend, Frisch began to study architecture at the Institute of Technology in Zurich; he received his diploma in 1941. In 1942, he opened his own architect’s office in Zurich. The highlight of his architectural career was his winning of a competition to build an open-air swimming pool complex in Zurich; this project, Freibad Letzigraben, completed in 1949, remains a tourist attraction in the early twenty-first century. In 1948, Frisch became acquainted with Bertolt Brecht, whose theories were to have an important influence on Frisch’s drama.

Frisch, an inveterate traveler, wrote in Tagebuch, 1946-1949 (1950; Sketchbook, 1946-1949, 1977) that we travel for two reasons: to meet others who do not assume that they know us intimately and to reexperience what is possible in life. Frisch traveled extensively in Europe and the United States and also visited Arab countries, Mexico, Cuba, the Soviet Union, Japan, and China. His experiences in the United States and Mexico are reflected especially in the novels I’m Not Stiller and Homo Faber and the short work Montauk. In 1954, Frisch gave up his architect’s office and began to earn his living solely as a writer. He died of cancer on April 4, 1991.

Biography

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

Max Frisch was born on May 15, 1911, into a middle-class Swiss household headed by Franz Bruno Frisch, an architect and real estate broker, and Karolina Bettina Wilderman Frisch. He attended the mathematical high school in Zurich and went to the University of Zurich in 1931 to study German. In 1933, his studies were interrupted by the death of his father and the resulting need for Frisch to support himself and his mother. Frisch then earned a living as a freelance reporter for Zurich’s liberal newspaper, Neue Zurcher Zeitung, and traveled to the Balkans and southeastern Europe. In 1935, he returned to Zurich to study architecture at the Federal Institute of Technology, earning his degree in 1940.

Between 1940...

(The entire section is 709 words.)

Biography

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

In the fictional worlds projected by Max Frisch’s novels and plays, human beings strive to accommodate themselves to socially defined roles, many times never fully understanding themselves and their true potential. The quest for identity is Frisch’s central theme, and his works provide examples of individuals who either fail in the process of self-discovery or make tentative stabs at reinventing themselves in more complex, imaginative, and morally responsible ways. This quest for identity drove Frisch’s own personal life and is reflected in his commitment to evolve his own consciousness.

Biography

(Great Authors of World Literature, Critical Edition)

Max Rudolf Frisch was arguably the most important Swiss writer of the twentieth century, considering his popular and critical successes in the areas of prose fiction and drama. He was born in Zurich to Franz Bruno Frisch, an architect, and Karolina Wildermuth. There he completed his schooling, studied German literature at the University of Zurich, and later completed a degree in architecture. During the 1930’s, Frisch traveled to Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Turkey, and Greece as a freelance journalist, until he was called into military service. During this time, he wrote prose sketches and fiction and made his first attempts at drama. At the conclusion of World War II, he traveled throughout Europe and was able to see the...

(The entire section is 541 words.)