Matilda Joslyn Gage Analysis

Matilda Joslyn Gage

Author Profile

Educated at home by her reform-minded father, Matilda Joslyn Gage became a founding member of the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and a contributor to The Revolution, its newspaper. The author of many pamphlets and books on women’s history, she argued that modern states often granted women less rights than ancient societies. Gage sat on the committee that helped Elizabeth Cady Stanton produce The Woman’s Bible (1895, 1898) and served as one of the editors of the six-volume History of Woman Suffrage (1881-1922). A wife and mother of five children, Gage nevertheless deemed the cause of liberty to be her most important concern.

Bibliography

Leach, William. True Love and Perfect Union: The Feminist Reform of Sex and Society. 2d ed. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1989. An interesting overview of the feminists within their social context that helps to explain the battles of reformers like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Gage.

Lindley, Susan Hill. “You Have Stept out of Your Place”: A History of Women and Religion in America. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster John Knox Press, 1996. An examination of the politics of the suffrage movement. Helpful regarding Gage’s unusual contributions.

Wagner, Sally Roesch. “Matilda Joslyn Gage.” In Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925, edited by Karlyn Kohrs Campbell. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1993. Focuses upon the role of Gage and her speeches in the feminist movement.

Bibliography

Leach, William. True Love and Perfect Union: The Feminist Reform of Sex and Society. 2d ed. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1989. An interesting overview of the feminists within their social context that helps to explain the battles of reformers like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Gage.

Lindley, Susan Hill. “You Have Stept out of Your Place”: A History of Women and Religion in America. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster John Knox Press, 1996. An examination of the politics of the suffrage movement. Helpful regarding Gage’s unusual contributions.

Wagner, Sally Roesch. “Matilda Joslyn Gage.” In Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925, edited by Karlyn Kohrs Campbell. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1993. Focuses upon the role of Gage and her speeches in the feminist movement.