Mary Stolz JENNIE D. LINDQUIST and VIRGINIA HAVILAND - Essay

JENNIE D. LINDQUIST and VIRGINIA HAVILAND

(Contemporary Literary Criticism)

When her mother died, Morgan Connor [in Ready or Not] had to take on the responsibility of caring for her younger brother and sister and keeping house for them and their father, whose job as a subway clerk barely supported the family. I question whether a young girl could possibly run a household as smoothly as she did and gone to school at the same time, but that is the only flaw I find in a far-above-average story remarkable for its perceptive character delineation. Not only the Connors but also Morgan's high school friends and their families, and Tom, the boy with whom she falls in love, are as real and as individual as living people. Mrs. Stolz seems to me our most outstanding writer of teen-age novels today. (p. 414)

Jennie D. Lindquist and Virginia Haviland, in The Horn Book Magazine (copyrighted, 1952, by The Horn Book, Inc., Boston), December 1952.

The characters [in Ready or Not] are very real people, not completely good and not completely bad. Morgan, in particular, is unusual as a heroine in a teen-age novel, for she is neither very pretty nor very bright, but the reader is drawn to her with a feeling of real understanding and sympathy for her problems. The author writes with a maturity and a depth of perception that are as welcome as they are rare in books written for teen-age readers. (p. 54)

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (published by the University of Chicago), March, 1953.