Margaret Cavendish Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Literary Criticism (1400-1800))

Biography

Haynes, Alan, " 'The First Great Lady': Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle." History Today XXVI, No. 11 (November 1976): 724-33.

Biographical discussion of Cavendish focusing on her life and literary career.

Jones, Kathleen. A Glorious Fame: The Life of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, 1623-1673. London: Bloomsbury, 1988, 192 p.

Extensive literary biography that praises Cavendish as a pioneer of the female literary tradition in the seventeenth century.

Criticism

Fitzmaurice, James. "Fancy and the Family: Self-characterizations of Margaret Cavendish." The Huntington Library Quarterly 53, No. 3 (Summer 1990): 199-209.

Examines Cavendish's conflicting self-portrayals, and attributes them to the necessity for a publishing woman writer in the seventeenth century to justify herself within traditionally acceptable frameworks.

Gagen, Jean. "Honor and Fame in the Works of the Duchess of Newcastle." Studies in Philology LVI, No. 3 (July 1959): 519-38.

Explains Cavendish's desire for fame in terms of Renaissance ideal of honor.

Meyer, Gerald Dennis. "The Fantastic Duchess of Newcastle." In The Scientific Lady in England 1650-1760: An Account of Her Rise, with Emphasis on the Major Roles of the Telescope and Microscope, pp. 1-5. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1955.

Highlights Cavendish's efforts to make science accessible to women in her time, stating that she was "the first Englishwoman to write extensively about science."

Rogers, Katharine M. "Erotic Scandals, Feminist Romances, and Revolutionary Fragments." Belles Lettres 8, No. 3 (Spring 1993): 16-18, 20.

Offers a brief review of Blazing World and asserts that the portrayal of Cavendish's aspirations in this novel is more significant than the actual achievement of her dreams.

"The Incomparable Margaret." The Times Literary Supplement No. 2864 (January 18, 1957): 29-30.

Highlights the conflict between Cavendish's desire for literary recognition and her lack of education.

Additional coverage of Cavendish's life and career is contained in the following source published by Gale Research: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vol. 131.