Characters

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Last Updated on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 339

D’Albert:

D’Albert is a romantic young Frenchman who longs for an ideal lover. At age 22, he considers himself worldly and sophisticated, and his good looks and high status make him appealing to women. D’Albert becomes romantically involved with Rosette, but he considers their relationship to be casual. He then...

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D’Albert:

D’Albert is a romantic young Frenchman who longs for an ideal lover. At age 22, he considers himself worldly and sophisticated, and his good looks and high status make him appealing to women. D’Albert becomes romantically involved with Rosette, but he considers their relationship to be casual. He then develops a crush on a young man, Théodore. His suspicions that Théodore is a disguised woman are later confirmed, but he must acknowledge his strong attraction to the male person. He also has a one-night liaison with Madelaine (the real woman who pretends to be Théodore), before she and her male alter ego leave.

Rosette:

Rosette is the lovely, charming, witty young woman who becomes d’Albert’s mistress. While they are sexually compatible, he dismisses her as emotionally incompatible. The plot complication revolves around her also falling in love with Théodore.

Madelaine de Maupin/Théodore de Sérannes:

Madelaine de Maupin and Théodore de Sérannes are actually two aspects of the same person. In reality, a clever, lovely young woman called Madelaine decides to disguise herself as a handsome young man in an effort to understand men, as she cannot figure out what makes them tick. While so disguised, her observations give her an overall negative view of the arrogance of male character. During part of the novel, she appears as Rosalind in William Shakespeare’s As You Like It for a theatrical production that the group stages. After she sleeps with d’Albert in what he considers one perfect night of love, she concludes that her bisexual inclinations do not allow her to be with him, and she leaves town the next day. In a letter, she encourages Rosette and d’Albert to get together and take their relationship seriously.

De C———:

De C———, another urbane sophisticate, is d’Albert’s friend; he introduces him to Rosette.

Isnabel:

Isnabel is a young woman who also disguises herself as a young man to serve as Théodore’s page.

Characters Discussed

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Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 464

M. d’Albert

M. d’Albert (dahl-BEHR), a young aesthete, handsome, well-educated, and worldly, who has dreamed of and who seeks an ideal woman. Though Rosette provides for a while an education in love’s delights, she cannot cure his moods of dreamy longing. Théodore both fascinates and troubles d’Albert, who (to Silvio) admits loving a man but a man who is almost certainly a woman in disguise. He is joyously surprised by Madelaine-Rosalind’s offer of a night of love, is transported by the wonderful love itself, and is left astonished at Théodore’s disappearance.

Rosette

Rosette, his mistress, a pretty and charming young woman prescribed by De C——— as a cure for d’Albert’s vaporish idealism. She is intelligent, witty, and capricious. From the beginning, she stirs d’Albert sexually and, becoming his mistress, delights him with a variety of pleasures. But these soon pall, and she struggles to conquer his boredom and his return to wistful dreaming. Simultaneously in love with the elusive Théodore, Rosette is saddened to learn that the disguised Isnabel is apparently Théodore’s mistress.

Théodore de Sérannes

Théodore de Sérannes (tay-oh-DOHR deh say-RAHN), in reality Mademoiselle Madelaine de Maupin. In disguise, Madelaine appears to be an extremely handsome young man, an accomplished conversationalist, horseman, and swordsman. Believing she could never, as a woman, discover the true nature of men, she has (posing as a man) somewhat bitterly observed their perfidy and shams when they thought themselves safe from exposure. After the smitten d’Albert has learned her secret, Madelaine (in costume as William Shakespeare’s Rosalind) appears in d’Albert’s room and grants him one night of perfect love. Also, after leaving d’Albert’s room, she spends a mysteriously lengthy visit with Rosette. She then goes out of the life of both Rosette and d’Albert forever, leaving each to comfort and love the other as best they may. As for herself, Madelaine confesses to Graciosa that a bisexual element in her nature prevents her from ever completely loving anyone, man or woman. Though in part modeled upon Shakespeare’s Rosalind, whom she plays in an amateur production of As You Like It, Madelaine is, especially in her sensuality, a very different woman.

De C———

De C———, a man of the world, d’Albert’s friend who introduces him to Rosette.

Madame de Thémines

Madame de Thémines (deh tay-MEEN), a fashionable madam and a former intimate of De C———.

Isnabel

Isnabel (eez-nah-BEHL), Théodore’s page, in reality a young woman whose sex is secretly discovered by Rosette after a riding accident.

Silvio

Silvio (seel-VYOH), d’Albert’s friend to whom he writes long confessional letters.

Graciosa

Graciosa (grah-SYOH-sah), Madelaine’s epistolary confidante.

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