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Lord of the Flies

by William Golding

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Why does Piggy believe no one will find them in Lord of the Flies?

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In chapter 1, Piggy befriends Ralph, and the two boys begin discussing the possibility of being rescued. Ralph confidently tells Piggy that his father is a commander in the Navy and will rescue them shortly. However, Piggy is more intelligent than Ralph and asks him how his father will know where they are located. When Ralph mentions that he told his father where they were heading before they left the airport, Piggy explains to Ralph that everyone at home has died from the atomic blast. Piggy then brings up the fact that they are on an uninhabited island, which means that they must have traveled far from their original course. Piggy understands that the majority of the people at home are probably dead and realizes that they have landed far away from their original destination. He also takes into consideration the fact that the pilot is dead, and the airplane has drifted out to sea. Therefore, Piggy concludes that no one will rescue them anytime soon and informs Ralph that they may die on the island.

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Of all the boys on the island, Piggy has the most logic and ability to reason.  despite Ralph's optimism that his naval commander father will come to their rescue, Piggy's outward perception of events convinces him that dreams of immediate rescue are futile.  He synthesizes three key facts about their crash before supporting this conclusion:  1) the plane crashed and the pilots are dead; 2)they did not arrive at their correct location, but were still en route over the Pacific; 3) He has reason to believe that every one may be dead because of the atom bomb war.  Piggy's careful conclusion forces Ralph and the other boys to accept their situation and circumstances, so that they may begin to plan for a long term stay.

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When Ralph comments that his father will surely find them on the tropical island because he is a commander in the Navy, Piggy logically concludes that no one will know their exact location because of the "atom bomb" and that they will be left on the island to fend for themselves. Given the wartime scenario, Piggy is aware that an atomic bomb has been dropped on England, which means that everyone in the blast radius is dead and that the country is devastated.

The boys were recently evacuated from England and were more than likely traveling to Australia, which is a former British colony. During their flight, the boys's plane was attacked and shot down from the sky. The pilot is dead and the body of the plane is completely destroyed. Piggy logically concludes that no one back home will be looking for them in the wake of a devastating nuclear attack and realizes that their plane is severely off course. The airline controllers in Australia awaiting the boys's arrival do not know their exact location because the plane is destroyed and the pilot died during the attack.

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Piggy concludes that no one will know where they are because of the possibility of the atom bomb.  He emphatically reminds Ralph:

"They're all dead," said Piggy, "an' this is an island.  Nobody don't know we're here.  Your dad do't know, nobody don't know--" (14).

Piggy's panicked spiel does contain some logic.  The plane crashed in the middle of the Pacific Ocean en route to Australia, and the pilot and crew most likely died on impact.  Because of the wartime conditions, it is very unlikely that the pilot would have radioed their location during an attack.  Beyond the crash of their own plane, the possibility of a devastating nuclear attack loomed large in Piggy's mind; the boys may have originally been evacuated to escape the danger of the rising nuclear conflict. 

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Why does Piggy conclude that no one will know where they are?

Early in the first chapter of Lord of the Flies, Ralph seems unconcerned about being rescued since he has so much faith in his father, who is a commander in the British navy. "When he gets leave, he'll come here and rescue us," Ralph tells Piggy. But Piggy is more realistic.

"How does he know we're here?"
Because, thought Ralph, because, because...
"They'd tell him at the airport."
Piggy shook his head...
"Not them. Didn't you hear what the pilot said? About the atom bomb. They're all dead...
"They're all dead," said Piggy, "an' this is an island. Nobody don't know we're here. Your dad don't know. Nobody don't know--
"We may stay here till we die."

Piggy is under the misapprehension that the atom bomb has killed many (if not all) of the British troops and sailors. Despite this misunderstanding--and his bad grammar--he is aware that no one could possibly know the boys have survived and are stranded on the island. He expects to be there a long time.

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In Lord of the Flies, why does Piggy conclude that no one will know where they are?

Piggy reaches this conclusion soon after they arrive on the island due to the war. He's convinced that too much of civilization will have been destroyed by the bombs, and that the survivors will be too distracted by the war and the aftermath, to look for them successfully.

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