Two separate illustrations of an animal head and a fire on a mountain

Lord of the Flies

by William Golding

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What does Jack believe is following him in the forest in Lord of the Flies?

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In the novel "Lord of the Flies", Jack believes he is being followed by a beast when he is alone in the forest. This feeling of being hunted, he describes, is not based on any tangible evidence but arises from his fear and vulnerability when he is alone in the jungle. This fear eventually spreads among the boys, leading to hysteria and the decapitation of pigs as sacrifices to the imagined beast.

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In chapter three, Ralph mentions that the littluns are scared and have trouble sleeping at night. Simon proceeds to mention that the littluns believe in the beastie, and Jack responds by sympathizing with their irrational fears. Jack goes on to describe what he experiences while hunting in the forest alone and says,

But you can feel as if you’re not hunting, but—being hunted, as if something’s behind you all the time in the jungle (Golding, 73).

Jack is essentially saying that he feels like the beast is following him in the forest while he is alone. Jack's feelings of vulnerability and dread are simply his imagination and fear of being in the forest alone. As the novel progresses, Samneric claim that they witnessed the beast on the top of the mountain, and hysteria quickly spreads throughout the group of boys. Everyone except Simon lives in fear, and the top of the mountain becomes off-limits after Ralph, Jack, and Roger mistake the dead paratrooper for the beast. Jack eventually begins decapitating pigs and sacrificing their heads to the beast after each kill.

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Where does Jack think he is being followed in the jungle in Lord of the Flies by William Golding?

In chapter 3, Jack is out hunting while Ralph and Simon attempt to finish constructing the shelters, which are shaky and unstable because all of the boys stopped helping them build. When Jack returns, he begins to bicker with Ralph over whether it is more important to hunt for meat or help build the shelters. Ralph then mentions to Jack that the littluns are afraid and continue to talk about the beast that supposedly inhabits the island. After Simon interrupts Ralph and Jack's conversation by saying that it seems as if the island isn't a good place, Jack says,

If you're hunting sometimes you catch yourself feeling as if . . . There's nothing in it of course. Just a feeling. But you can feel as if you're not hunting, but—being hunted, as if something's behind you all the time in the jungle (Golding, 40).

Ralph remains incredulous after Jack's admission that he feels the presence of some unknown being following him throughout the forest while he hunts. Jack then gets to his feet and says that while he doesn't personally believe in the beast he understands the way the littluns feel. According to Jack, the creepy feeling that something is following him in the forest is very real and frightening.

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Where does Jack think he is being followed in the jungle in Lord of the Flies by William Golding?

Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, is set on a tropical island, and all of the characters are young boys, roughly between the ages of six and thirteen or so. The boys have been stranded here alone, without any adults, so it is not surprising that they have all begin to have nightmares and fears about their situation. You ask where Jack thinks he is being followed in the jungle, but it is clear you know it happens while he is in the jungle; so I assume you mean either where in the book does this happen or what does Jack think is following him. 

In chapter three, Jack admits to feeling as though he is being followed sometimes, though he only admits it to Ralph in a moment of candid revelation and soon wants to deny ever having admitted something which he sees as weakness.  Ralph says they all need the shelters because they will serve as a reminder of home, and they may serve to help the boys have fewer nightmares. Jack says:

“All the same—in the forest. I mean when you’re hunting, not when you’re getting fruit, of course, but when you’re on your own—” He paused for a moment, not sure if Ralph would take him seriously.

“Go on.”

“If you’re hunting sometimes you catch yourself feeling as if—” He flushed suddenly. “There’s nothing in it of course. Just a feeling. But you can feel as if you’re not hunting, but—being hunted, as if something’s behind you all the time in the jungle.”
They were silent again: Simon intent, Ralph incredulous and faintly indignant. He sat up, rubbing one shoulder with a dirty hand. “Well, I don’t know.”
Jack leapt to his feet and spoke very quickly. “That’s how you can feel in the forest. Of course there’s nothing in it. Only—only—” He took a few rapid steps toward the beach, then came back. “Only I know how they feel. See? That’s all.”

This is one of only a few times in the novel that Jack admits to any weakness. He is one of the older boys and he has explored more of the island than anyone else as he has been hunting, so he knows there is no actual beast there. Nevertheless, he sometimes succumbs to the same fears as the other boys. Just as we have all experienced the shiver of fear thinking about something hiding under the bed (and take a flying leap to avoid getting "caught") or in the closet but know there is nothing there, so Jack feels the "creepy" fear of wondering if he is being followed by an imaginary creature. 

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