Two separate illustrations of an animal head and a fire on a mountain

Lord of the Flies

by William Golding

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What are Ralph and Jack's leadership styles in Lord of the Flies?

Quick answer:

In Lord of the Flies, Ralph's leadership style is more democratic and egalitarian. He values everyone's opinion, fairly distributes the work among the boys, and protects vulnerable individuals. Ralph acts as a positive role model but struggles to motivate the boys to complete necessary tasks. In contrast, Jack is a ruthless tyrant with a dictatorial leadership style. He uses fear, intimidation, and violence to control his tribe and manipulates the boys to obey his every command.

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Ralph, the quintessential English boy, models his leadership on the ideals of inclusiveness, egalitarianism, and democracy that he has internalized from his culture. The conch, which has an authority outside of any single individual, is the symbol of his approach to leadership. The conch calls the group together, and anyone who holds it can have a voice in the society.

Rationalism and deferment of present pleasure for future gain are hallmarks of how Ralph (and Piggy) think about governance. Ralph knows, for instance, that it is not fun to watch the fire or build huts, but understands the future value of these activities: the fire represents their hope of rescue, while the huts could protect them for future dangers, such as bad weather.

Jack, on the other hand, realizing he can't match Ralph on rationalistic grounds, appeals to the emotional, not the logical, side of the boys. He wants power for power's sake, is not interested in democracy, and offers the boys the allure of indulging their deepest, most forbidden desires. He recruits the boys with the word "fun" and puts present pleasure ahead of future gain. Most of the boys are taken in by the allure of his vision of painting themselves, hunting, and engaging in frenzied dances and rituals. Against this, Ralph's civilized world seems dull and uninspiring.

In sum, Ralph is a rationalistic leader who believes in rules, democracy, and fairness, while Jack is a demagogue who appeals to his followers' base emotions to gain power.

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The respective leadership styles of Ralph and Jack really couldn't be more different. Ralph believes in democracy—believes that important decisions should only be taken on the basis of a majority vote after everyone has been consulted. This is a key element of Ralph's vision of the island as a rules-based order where there is stability and good administration.

Jack, on the other hand, has a leadership style that's a good deal more authoritarian than Ralph's. He's not remotely interested in democracy or establishing a rules-based order on the island. He simply wants to be a dictator.

It may not be a good idea for Jack to try and establish a dictatorship, but he certainly has the personality for it. Unlike Ralph, Jack couldn't care less about the other boys and their welfare; he simply wants to exploit them to his own advantage. If any of them step out of line, he won't hesitate to use violence against them—the same kind of violence he uses against pigs.

Though Ralph is as charismatic as Jack—perhaps even more so—he doesn't base his leadership upon it. That's because he puts more trust in rules, reason, and logic. The same cannot be said of Jack, who uses—or rather, abuses—his charisma to establish firm control over the boys.

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In Golding's classic novel Lord of the Flies, Ralph and Jack have completely different leadership styles that reflect their personalities and outlook on civilization. Ralph is the elected chief and acts as a democratic, benevolent leader. He values the boys' opinions and creates the rule regarding the conch, which allows everyone a fair chance to speak. Ralph is also a more altruistic leader who looks out for vulnerable, weak individuals like Piggy and the littluns. There are numerous occasions when Ralph defends Piggy and stands up for the littluns. For example, one of the main reasons Ralph builds shelters on the beach is to make the littluns comfortable, and he also confronts Jack about stealing Piggy's glasses.

As a proponent of civilization, Ralph values order, responsibility, and harmony. In an attempt to establish a civil society, Ralph instructs the boys to complete various tasks but has difficulty enforcing his rules. He also tries to act as a positive role model, which does not seem to work. Jack easily undermines Ralph's leadership by influencing the hunters to neglect their responsibilities. Despite Ralph's good intentions and benevolent nature, he quickly loses control over the group.

Jack is depicted as a ruthless tyrant with a dictatorial leadership style. Unlike Ralph, Jack neglects civilization and purposely cultivates a hysterical, chaotic environment where the hunters are on edge and rely on him for protection from the beast. Jack's main method of leadership relies on fear and intimidation. He demands complete obedience from his followers and does not hesitate to punish or torture anyone.

In addition to using fear and intimidation, Jack is also a clever, shrewd leader who manipulates his followers. He spreads false information about the beast, uses Ralph and Piggy as scapegoats, and portrays himself as a god-like idol. Jack understands what inherently motivates the boys and uses this to his advantage. By the end of the story, Jack is in a position of authority and instructs his followers to hunt Ralph.

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Jack is an authoritarian leader while Ralph is more of an egalitarian. Even in the first chapter, Jack is shown as a strict leader who demands obedience as his choir members follow him across the beach. He has made them march in line in their hot uniforms, and Simon ends up passing out because of the heat. Jack immediately puts himself forward as a potential chief, claiming he is "chapter chorister and head boy." Later, in one of the meetings, he tries to stifle the free speech of the others, saying that they should "leave deciding things to the rest of us." When he starts his own tribe, he has two boys say, "The chief has spoken," and he sits like an idol at his feast. He beats Wilfred for no apparent reason.

Ralph doesn't seek out being chief, but once he is voted in, he tries to include others in his decisions. He immediately allows Jack to choose an area to be the head of, and Jack chooses hunting. During meetings he enforces the rule of the conch, allowing everyone to speak in turn. He allows a discussion of the boys' fears, although that ends up working against him. He feels bad when Jack deserts the group, even though Piggy is pleased. He listens to advice from Simon and Piggy, and in chapter 11, he listens to Samneric and Piggy as they plan their visit to Castle Rock. 

Although Jack rules as a dictator, Ralph demonstrates a more democratic style of leadership.

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What are three main similarities and differences between Jack and Ralph from the novel Lord of the Flies?

Differences

1). Ralph makes it clear from the start that he wants to establish a rule-based order on the island. He knows that if the boys are to survive, they need to create some semblance of civilization. Otherwise, without adult supervision, they're likely to descend into outright violence.

Jack, however, couldn't care less about any of this. He just wants to be king of the castle, the absolute ruler and dictator of the island. Far from seeing violence as a threat, he welcomes it as a way of consolidating his power and exerting control over the other boys.

2). Jack sees the whole experience of being stranded on a desert island as nothing more than a big adventure. As such, he sees it as an opportunity to have fun. Ralph, on the other hand, has a much more serious approach. He knows that there's work to be done, such as building fires, constructing shelters, and sourcing food supplies.

3). Jack is a sadist. He derives great pleasure from inflicting pain and suffering on others, whether animals or other boys. Although Ralph participates in the crazed dancing ritual that culminates in Simon's brutal murder, he feels pretty bad about it afterward, indicating that, unlike Jack, he's no sadist and actually has a conscience.

Similarities

1). Jack and Ralph are both take-charge personalities. It's clear from the get-go that this island just isn't big enough for the both of them. Each boy has a vision of how he wants life on the island to develop and the leading role he will play in that development.

2). Boys will be boys, and even the heroic Ralph can't shake off the fact that he's still a schoolboy. He, along with Jack, is a willing participant in the wild dancing ritual mentioned earlier that ended in Simon's brutal slaying. Though both boys are strong individuals, they do still feel the need to be part of a group, part of something bigger than themselves.

3). Jack and Ralph are both natural leaders in that they display great charisma. The difference, of course, lies in how they use their natural leadership skills. Nevertheless, it's notable that the boys initially accept Ralph as their leader; there's clearly something about him, some kind of aura to which they instinctively respond.

Much the same could be said of Jack. Even though they boys must realize deep down that following Jack can only lead to bloodshed and chaos, they choose to do so anyway. Once again, there's something magnetic about Jack's personality that makes these boys want to be part of his gang.

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What are three main similarities and differences between Jack and Ralph from the novel Lord of the Flies?

In William Golding's allegory Lord of the Flies, Ralph and Jack represent many of the qualities and faults in man.

  • Similarities

--Leadership
Both Ralph and Jack exhibit leadership qualities, although their styles of leadership differ. They both make decisions for others and are able to direct those under them.
Whereas Ralph is committed to morality and Jack to brute force, they both strive to control those under them.

--Respect
Both are respected by the boys who are their followers. Ralph's physical appeal is powerful: He is possessive of the "golden body"(Ch.1) and is able to "turn neatly on his feet" (Ch.1) much like a ancient Greek or Roman athlete. Jack, a redhead, possesses a fierceness that commands respect and obedience out of fear, however. 

--Inherent Violence
Both enjoy violence and the atavistic appeal to their intrinsic natures as in, for instance, the excitement of the hunt.

[Jack] tried to convey the compulsion to track down and kill that was swallowing him up.

"I went on. I thought, by myself—"
The madness came into his eyes again."I thought I might kill." (Chapter 3)

 Even in the hunting ritual in which Simon is pulled in and beaten to death, Ralph participates in the suffering imposed upon this sensitive boy and does not order any one to stop. It is only later that he feels guilt.

  • Differences

--Personalities:
Ralph and Jack differ in their personalities as Ralph listens to Piggy, the voice of reason, and Simon, the spiritual voice. He is open to the ideas and opinions of others.
Jack, on the other hand, is dictatorial and violent; he prefers action to reasoning and discussion. He rules by intimidation.

--Manner of ruling:
Ralph continually strives for democracy since he tries to hold meetings in which individuals are allowed to voice their opinions and suggestions as they hold the conch. He also appeals to the boys' sense of duty and adherence to civilized methods of discussion such as the rules of order.

Jack, on the other hand, is dictatorial in his ruling of the hunters. He uses intimidation and fear--at one point Sam-n-Eric tell Ralph that they are beaten if they do not follow Jack's orders--and he has Roger following behind Jack as they ascend the mountain in Chapter Seven. When Ralph rests, the "impervious" Roger bangs "his silly wooden stick against something" to intimidate Ralph. Later, Jack tries to flush out Ralph and capture him during his savage pursuit by setting fire to the brush.

Appearance:
Ralph abhors his long hair "creeping into his eyes again" (Ch. 5), and he yearns for his home and civilization where he was neat and clean and life was orderly. On the other hand, Jack enjoys painting his face and running around with few, if any, clothes on him. He likes the spontaneity of the hunt and the impetuous satisfaction of urges.

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What are three main similarities and differences between Jack and Ralph from the novel Lord of the Flies?

Similarities and differences between Ralph and Jack in William Golding's Lord of the Flies:

DIFFERENCES.  Ralph is the more intelligent of the two. Ralph seems to be far more concerned with being rescued than Jack. Ralph's desire to maintain an orderly and democratic system of life while on the island is much stronger than Jack's idea of fairness.

SIMILARITIES.  I see far fewer similarities between the two boys. However, both Jack and Ralph have obvious leadership qualities and show their bravery while hunting. They are both athletic, and they are English. 

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What are the similarities between Ralph and Jack's style of leadership in Lord of the Flies by William Golding?

Both boys are very charismatic and use their charisma to persuade others to follow them. The key difference of course is that Ralph uses his charisma for good, whereas Jack abuses his natural gift, using it to establish dictatorial control over the other boys. There's also something very practical about the two rival leaders. After he's indulged in a spot of fun like all of the other boys on the island, Ralph quickly gets down to business, organizing all of the things that need to be done, pulling up his sleeves and getting his hands dirty to set an example.

For his part, Jack understands the importance of establishing a regular food supply, which means going off to hunt pigs at every opportunity. Jack's practicality is tinged with self-interest; he doesn't hunt pigs out of the goodness of his heart to provide food for the other boys. Leading the brutal pig hunts gives him the power and control he so desperately craves.

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What are the similarities between Ralph and Jack's style of leadership in Lord of the Flies by William Golding?

Both Ralph and Jack choose to lead by example, and they both aggressively stand up to challenges in front of their group members in order to elevate their status as leaders. Also, Ralph and Jack both demand a lot from the members of their tribes. Ralph insists on maintaining a signal fire, building shelters, collecting water, and following the rules. Jack also insists that his tribe hunt pigs and follow his directives without questioning him. Both boys get upset when their members do not follow their instructions. Ralph and Jack also share a misunderstanding of how to lead a group of young boys properly. Ralph does not make individuals accountable for their actions. Jack uses fear to control his tribe. Although Ralph and Jack have drastically different agendas, they both wish to be respected leaders and have high expectations for the members of their tribes.

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How does the contrast between Jack's and Ralph's personalities reveal itself at the meeting in Lord of the Flies?

The most obvious way Jack and Ralph's personalities reveal themselves at the meeting is when the boys decide to vote for whether Jack or Ralph should be the group's leader. Jack disagrees with the idea. He thinks that in the short time he has been with the group, he has more than shown his leadership qualities. Ralph, on the other hand, not only encourages the vote but encourages them to do so in a fair manner.

The author highlights Jack's dictatorial approach to leadership even before the meeting starts. As the leader of a choir, Jack marches his group towards the meeting in such an organized manner that from a distance they look like one big, dark monster.

When he finally arrives, the author describes him as follows.

His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness. Out of his face stared two light blue eyes, frustrated now, and turning, or ready to turn, to anger.

Jack then tries to assert his authority by first mocking Piggy and then questioning why someone of his stature, leader of the choir, should be treated the same as the younger boys. Overview, his manner is intimidating and bullying, yet very assertive.

In comparison, Ralph presents himself as far more democratic and fair. As well as presiding over the vote, he goes out of his way to make Jack feel part of the group when Jack loses. He tells Jack that he is still the leader of his choir and that they can contribute to the group in whatever way he chooses.

One could argue at this point that Ralph has given too much leeway to someone who is quite obviously his own man. Yes, it is important to keep Jack on his side, but Ralph does say in a manner that encourages his bullying attitude.

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How does the contrast between Jack's and Ralph's personalities reveal itself at the meeting in Lord of the Flies?

The meeting shows clearly the contrast between Ralph's and Jack's personalities. More crucially, it shows the massive difference between their respective political visions for life on the island. Ralph is all about rules and regulations. He wants to establish some semblance of order on the island, and he knows that this is the right way to do it.

He ensures that the first big meeting of the boys is a suitably orderly affair, where possession of the conch shell confers an authority to speak to the assembled throng. Ralph clearly believes that democracy is the best and fairest way to run the island. Although he is the undisputed leader, he also believes in letting everyone else have their say.

Jack, on the other hand, has no time for democracy at all. His behavior at the meeting shows an impatience with the niceties of majority rule. Far from the conch conferring authority, he sees as it as taking it away from him. As far as he's concerned, he's the rightful ruler of the island, whatever the other boys might think. For now, Jack reluctantly defers to Ralph's leadership. But he's just biding his time until he feels strong enough to challenge Ralph. Then he will destroy both the conch shell and the rules-based order it represents.

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How does the contrast between Jack's and Ralph's personalities reveal itself at the meeting in Lord of the Flies?

In the first chapter, Ralph and Piggy find the conch and use it to summon the other boys. Ralph is already establishing himself as a leader and an efficient organizer. When Jack shows up, he acts superior and asserts his own leadership. Although Jack does act like he is the obvious choice for chief, the boys sense something about Ralph that make him seem like an able leader as well: 

But there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out; there was his size and attractive appearance; and most obscurely, yet most powerfully, there was the conch. The being that had blown that, had sat waiting for them on the platform with the delicate thing balanced on his knees, was set apart. 

The conch established Ralph as the organizer and therefore the leader. When they elect Ralph as chief, Ralph tries to placate Jack by offering him the choir. Ralph has made this first gesture to avoid a power struggle between he and Jack. Although he appreciates this, Jack is not as thoughtful as Ralph and the power struggle will inevitably emerge. 

In Chapter 2, when Ralph calls another assembly with the conch, he says that everyone can speak but he must be holding the conch. Jack is interested in having rules but he is more excited about what they might do if someone breaks the rules. Jack is clearly establishing himself as someone who wants to be leader because of the power. Ralph wants to lead to get things accomplished. In addition to addressing their daily needs, Ralph assures them that they will be rescued and he gains their respect. 

The assembly was lifted toward safety by his words. They liked and now respected him. Spontaneously they began to clap and presently the platform was loud with applause. Ralph flushed, looking sideways at Piggy's open admiration, and then the other way at Jack who was smirking and showing that he too knew how to clap. 

 

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Who is the better leader, Jack or Ralph, in Lord of the Flies?

One could make the argument that Ralph is a better leader simply because his policies promote civility, structure, and democracy. Ralph demonstrates an ability to think clearly, prioritize, act as a positive role model, and address controversial topics as the elected chief. Ralph is also goal-oriented and is depicted as a courageous leader. Sadly, Ralph lacks an understanding of humanity's inherent desires and is not an effective motivator. The majority of the boys quickly join Jack's tribe of savages, where they have the opportunity to act on their primitive desires.

While Ralph has positive intentions and attempts to establish a civil society as the elected leader, Jack is more of a natural leader. His enthusiasm is contagious, and he understands what truly motivates the boys. Despite Jack's malevolent, violent personality, he is a more effective leader than Ralph and demonstrates the ability to control and motivate his hunters. Jack rules as a tyrant, is a resolute leader, and commands obedience throughout his tribe. While one could argue that Jack is a more innate, natural leader, Ralph is still considered a better leader because his goals are positive and he is not selfishly motivated like Jack.

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Who is the better leader, Jack or Ralph, in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph is a better overall leader in Lord of the Flies, because he has the boys' best interests at heart.  He builds shelters to protect the littluns, tries to diffuse worries over the beast, arranges for a signal fire for rescue, and attempts to lead the assembly meetings in a way that best represents everyone's interests.  Jack's leadership style is very self-serving; he wants the attention and respect, but does little to earn it for himself.  He does not want to help Ralph build shelters and only cares about hunting.  When he does eventually become leader, he uses torture and fear tactics to command respect and obedience from the other boys.  Jack's tactics only bring chaos to the island.

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What is the conflict between Ralph and Jack in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph did not always represent the good in the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Although we tend to associate the conflict between the two boys in terms of good and evil, the reality in the text is much more blurred. For example, when Ralph first meets Piggy, he is not good or spiritual; enough to recognise the good (priceless) qualities of this new potential friend. a true friend is one of the most precious things we can be lucky enough to attain in life, yet when the other boys come along, Ralph spurns Piggy. He even joins in with the evil derision by betraying Piggy's trust and telling the boys his nick name. So the whole book is about conflict - the inner conflicts of the individual as well as the outer conflicts between individuals

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What is the conflict between Ralph and Jack in Lord of the Flies?

I guess you could say that there is conflict on two levels.  On the literal level (what is actually going on in the book) the two are in conflict because they both want to lead the group of boys.  They also do not agree on what is most important -- hunting or building huts and trying to get rescued.

On a more figurative level (symbolic), Jack is the dark side of human nature.  He is in conflict with the part of human nature that wants to be civilized and do good things.

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How do Jack and Ralph use power differently in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph is a proponent of civilization and uses his authority as chief to establish a civil, democratic society, while Jack uses his authority to rule as a brutal tyrant toward the end of the novel. Ralph holds assemblies, during which he encourages each boy to speak openly, creates necessary rules, and directs the boys to complete numerous tasks that increase their chances of survival and rescue. While Ralph is depicted as a relatively poor leader, he attempts to use his authority in a benevolent manner. Ralph is primarily concerned about the littluns' well-being and the boys' chances of rescue and survival on the island.

In contrast, Jack uses his authority to protect his position of power and to advance his status among the boys. Jack selfishly wields power by threatening and manipulating the boys. Jack expects complete and utter obedience and tortures whoever disagrees with his political agenda. Unlike Ralph, Jack is not concerned with any of the boys' well-being, and he does not promote democracy. He rules as a brutal tyrant and effectively controls the boys through intimidation, manipulation, and force of personality. The boys respect Jack as an expert hunter and protector, and they also fear him. While Ralph is the more civil leader, he is less effective and cannot properly lead the boys when given the opportunity.

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How do Jack and Ralph use power differently in Lord of the Flies?

Jack uses his power to gain more power for himself. He seeks to build up his power so everyone follows and obeys him - so everyone does his bidding, and he becomes essentially a dictator. The reason Jack desires power is to make himself feel more powerful.

Ralph uses power for the good of the group. He wants people to listen to him because he believes he offers the best solution for the group as a whole. He is more interested in creating a functional "society" than amassing power for his own well-being. The problem is that Ralph does not possess the charisma that Jack does. Jack has more drive because of his personal goal of power.

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Who is a better leader in the novel Lord of the Flies, Jack or Ralph?

One can argue for either character in regards to who is the better leader. It is my opinion that Ralph is the better leader throughout the novel. Towards the end of the novel, Jack successfully unites most of the boys through promises of meat, but also uses fear and intimidation to gain their support. However, Ralph is the first person to unite the castaway boys and establish rules. It is Ralph, not Jack, who is elected as leader. Ralph displays positive leadership skills that include establishing important routines and tasks that increase the boys' chance of survival and rescue. Ralph is both patient and stern depending on the situation and exercises good judgement during times of adversity. Ralph is focused on the important tasks that ensure the boys' survival while Jack is preoccupied with hunting and swimming. Unlike Jack, who is ruthless towards certain boys, Ralph shows some sympathy towards weaker characters like Simon, Piggy, and the littluns. Ralph advocates equality amongst the boys while Jack's totalitarian leadership enforces rules based his liking. Had Jack not undermined Ralph's leadership, Simon and Piggy would have survived, and the boys might have been rescued when the ship passed the island in Chapter 4.

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Who is the better leader, Jack or Ralph, in Lord of the Flies?

You have to be careful in how you define leadership, though.  Successful leadership could simply mean the ability to get people to follow you.  In that manner, Jack would be an excellent leader also (of course, so would Hitler).  If your question is simply asking which boy would make better, more sound decisions in a leadership role, then your answer is certainly Ralph without question.  But in terms of building a following, Jack was much more effective.

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Who is the better leader, Jack or Ralph, in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph is more kind and level-headed.  He sees the big picture and assigns jobs so that the picture can be drawn.  He is not without a sense of fun, but duty comes first.  My vote is with Ralph.

Jack rules by fear.  He taunts and punishes.  He doesn't care for order or rules, only fun...HIS FUN.  He is selfish and cruel.  He is any number of the tyrants who have ruled in the world and have been made to stand down by other more humane leaders.

 

 

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Who is the better leader, Jack or Ralph, in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph is the moral, orderly leader who is interested in productive leadership, and hopes for rescue. 

"The fair-haired, tall, handsome Ralph is an obvious choice to lead the band of children stranded on the island. He has a "directness" in his manner that the narrator calls a sign of "genuine leadership."

Jack is a representative of the savage instincts that emerge from the boys.  He is physically stronger, more intimidating.  He lusts for power and uses the boys to feed his desire for power.  Ultimately, Ralph becomes subordinate to Jack, almost falling into his savagery, but resists.  Jack is also a natural leader, he proposes that the boys call him chief. 

"It's true that Jack has the advantage of being tall; his direction of the choir is another sign of an "obvious leader."

It depends on how you define better.  Ralph is moral.  Jack is savage, savvy and strong, he gets the upper hand.  So is leadership defined by who is better qualified to lead?  The success the leader has, or the moral character that the leader exemplifies?

Clearly, Jack taps into an evil force while the boys are on the island, while Ralph, though seriously tempted, resists. 

Although Jack's actions help the boys physically survive, Ralph is my choice for the better leader. 

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Compare and contrast Jack and Ralph in Lord of the Flies by providing comparative quotes from the novel.

Ralph and Jack are two contrasting characters. They symbolize the two extremes of humankind. When we are introduced to them, the text provides clear descriptors which distinguish the two.

In chapter one, Ralph is described as follows:

The boy with fair hair...

The fair boy stopped...

Throughout the chapter, the word 'fair' is repeated to emphasize not only what Ralph looks like, but also to suggest his inner nature. The word tells us that, in character, Ralph is not rash or prejudiced and that he judges others equally. One expects that he would provide a reasonable assessment of things and that his perspective would be balanced and that he would seek equitable solutions to problems or situations.

Ralph is further described as follows:

He was old enough, twelve years and a few months, to have lost the prominent tummy of childhood and not yet old enough for adolescence to have made him awkward. You could see now that he might make a boxer, as far as width and heaviness of shoulders went, but there was a mildness about his mouth and eyes that proclaimed no devil. 

Clearly, Ralph does not seem to possess any element of evil although he has the physique to exercise power.

In contrast, the reference to Jack, as part of a group of approaching boys, reads:

Here, the eye was first attracted to a black, bat-like creature that danced on the sand, and only later perceived the body above it. The bat was the child’s shadow, shrunk by the vertical sun to a patch between the hurrying feet.

The focus on darkness and creatures associated with the dark is pertinent. The contrast between the 'fair' and 'black, bat-like creature' cannot be more obvious. The reference to darkness suggests something malevolent and the disparity to 'proclaimed no devil' is clear. The distinction between the two boys is emphasized.

Jack was wearing a black cloak, which further brings up the image of someone veiled in and surrounded by, darkness. The image forebodes the occurrence of something wicked, just like the cloak of a magician or witch would signify an indulgence with dark forces.

Physically, Jack is also different to Ralph:

Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness. Out of this face stared two light blue eyes, frustrated now, and turning, or ready to turn, to anger.

Ralph had been painted as wholesome and athletic whilst Jack seems almost skeletal and, with his cloak, could be a representation of some creature of the dark, hungry and lean. Furthermore, Jack's features are much more pronounced - red hair and eyes which could easily turn to anger, suggests someone aggressive and short-tempered.

As the novel progresses, we discover that these descriptions are accurate indicators as to the nature of the two boys and how dissimilar they were. Since the two are the most distinguishable of all the boys, it stands to reason that they would vie for leadership. In the end, it is Ralph who is chosen. This, however, does no deter Jack from later forming a splinter group, the hunters, who he dominates completely.

This act by Jack also indicates his selfish nature for he wants to hunt and have fun whilst Ralph is more concerned about keeping a signal fire burning and building shelters. It becomes important for Ralph to maintain rules and create order, whilst Jack wants to do as he pleases.

These two contrasting approaches lead to conflict between the two boys.

“You wouldn’t care to help with the shelters, I suppose?”
“We want meat—”
“And we don’t get it.”
Now the antagonism was audible.
“But I shall! Next time! I’ve got to get a barb on this spear! We wounded a pig and the spear fell out. If we could only make barbs— ” “We need shelters.”
Suddenly Jack shouted in rage.
“Are you accusing—?”
“All I’m saying is we’ve worked dashed hard. That’s all.”
They were both red in the face and found looking at each other diffi- cult.

Jack becomes immersed in hunting and neglects doing his duty. he takes a number of boys with him and when they return with a slain pig, the fire had gone out at a time when a ship passed by the island. The antagonism between the boys increase as a result. Ralph is bitter for he feels that they could have been rescued. Jack apologizes for his irresponsible actions later, but the battle lines have clearly been drawn.

Jack's obsession with shedding blood grows and he and his hunters later isolate themselves from the other boys. They paint their faces and become savages. The island is divided in to two distinct camps - one which seeks rescue and wants to maintain order, led by Ralph, and the other that is brutal and does not care, led by Jack.

Eventually, Jack uses force and intimidation to isolate Ralph. He sees him as a threat and decides that he should be done away with. Ralph, in his vulnerable state, is saved by the arrival of a naval officer which also ends the conflict. The boys are rescued and taken back to civilization.

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What are Ralph and Jack's leadership techniques in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph tries to rule with a sense of democracy, but he nags when he is ineffective.  Jack rules through totalitarian means, and relies on fear to make sure no one defies him.

Ralph is the one who directs things from the beginning, always focusing on a practical purpose.  He blows the seashell and it calls the boys together.  He then determines that they need a leader. 

“Shut up,” said Ralph absently. He lifted the conch. “Seems to me we ought to have a chief to decide things.”

“A chief! A chief!”

“I ought to be chief,” said Jack with simple arrogance, “because I’m chapter chorister and head boy. I can sing C sharp.” (Ch. 1) 

Notice the difference between Ralph and Jack’s approach.  Jack believes that he should be the leader.  He doesn’t think that a leader should be voted on, he just assumes that it should be him.  To him, leaders are determined based on accomplishments.  He has been leader, of the choir, and he can sing.  Thus, he should be leader now.  He doesn’t want a vote, but gives in to the masses. 

What Jack does approve of is the need for rules.  He wants to have rules, because rules allow him to impose his will on others.  He immediately associates rules with punishments for offenders. 

Jack was on his feet.

“We’ll have rules!” he cried excitedly. “Lots of rules! Then when anyone breaks ’em–” (Ch. 1) 

As leader, Ralph is fairly ineffectual.  He uses the conch to call meetings to order.  During meetings, the boys use it for turn-taking.  Ralph then spends most of his time as leader complaining about the fact that the other boys aren’t doing anything.  They aren’t building shelters or tending fires as he would like. 

Jack has a different leadership style.  After the schism, he takes the hunters and most of the older boys and they focus on killing pigs.  Meat is not the only thing they want.  They also want to kill the pig, and create a pig-killing dance complete with war paint.  Jack has Wilfred tied to a tree and beaten, apparently just to prove he is in charge.

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How are Ralph and Jack effective or ineffective leaders in Lord of the Flies?

There are multiple questions being asked here, so you can feel free to answer in 1 of 4 ways.

  1. Jack is an effective leader.
  2. Jack is an ineffective leader.
  3. Ralph is an effective leader.
  4. Ralph is an ineffective leader.

It's up to individual readers to decide which choice that they believe is most correct. If I'm honest, I believe that both leaders prove to be effective. At different points in the story, both boys are able to motivate and lead large groups of the boys. They have polar opposite leadership styles. Ralph is a much more democratic leader. He was elected chief, and he implements the rule about the conch equaling the right to speak in an open forum type concept. The boys like this kind of leadership, because they believe that have a voice in how they are governed. Jack's leadership is much more like a dictatorship or monarchy. He gives orders, and he expects them to be followed. Anybody that stands in his way is eliminated in one way or another. In Jack's mind, might makes right. As long as he is able to maintain fear in the other boys, they choose to follow him. Choosing anything else might mean death, but that doesn't change the fact that Jack is able to lead a group of boys. If you are looking for an ineffective leader, then look to Piggy. He is incredibly smart and insightful, yet he can never effectively convey his messages in a way that gets the boys to act on his ideas. That's why he needs Ralph.

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How are Ralph and Jack effective or ineffective leaders in Lord of the Flies?

Please limit your number of questions to one per eNotes post.

I don't believe either Ralph or Jack proves to be an effective leader. They are both selected by the boys during their simple election process because they are the two oldest boys. Jack, of course, is already the authoritarian chief of the choir, so it is logical that he is considered. However, Jack does not really believe in the democratic process, and he doesn't consider all of the boys--especially the younger ones--as equals. Jack easily loses focus when he becomes addicted to the blood lust of the hunt for pigs. Even as a second in command, he is unable to fulfill his duty of keeping the fire going. Ralph is a better choice, but he doesn't use his ally, Piggy, in a proper manner, nor does he show loyalty toward him. After Ralph loses control, he eventually becomes content to join with those who have deserted him.

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How do Ralph and Jack use their power differently as leaders in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph uses his role as leader for the good of the group, but Jack uses it to gain and keep power for himself.

When Ralph is elected chief, he takes the role seriously.  He wants to help the boys get rescued, and live comfortably while they are there.  Building shelters and a signal fire are the most important things for him. 

Jack sees it differently.  When Ralph is elected leader, Jack jumps in immediately to focus on the use of power.

Jack was on his feet.

“We’ll have rules!” he cried excitedly. “Lots of rules! Then when anyone breaks ’em–” (ch 2)

Jack seems to only want rules for the fun of punishing anyone who breaks them.  Ralph, on the other hand, just wants to get things done.

Ralph and Jack have conflicts over the difference in their emphasis.  Jack and his hunters like to kill pigs, not just because they bring food but because killing them is fun.  Ralph thinks that the fire is more important.

You hunters! You can laugh! But I tell you the smoke is more important than the pig, however often you kill one. Do all of you see?” (ch 5)

The difference in focus eventually leads Jack to break away from the group.  When he is in charge, he is even more violent and impulsive.  He beats boys for no apparent reason, just to prove that he has power.  He and his tribe paint their faces and do pig dances, but there is no focus on practical things like keeping a signal fire going.

As leaders, Jack is tyrannical and Ralph is democratic.  Neither one is effective though, because Jack rules by fear and Ralph can't keep control.

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Who is a better leader in Lord of the Flies by William Golding, Ralph or Jack?

The two leaders who immediately rise to leadership on the first day after the boys crash-land on the island in Lord of the Flies by William Golding are Ralph and Jack; however, it is clear that neither of them is in this position because he has proven himself to be a good leader. 

Ralph has everything it takes to look like a leader. He is tall, straight, good-looking, and strong; during the elections, he stays above the noise and tumult, and the younger boys see his as a leader.

Jack started to protest but the clamor changed from the general wish for a chief to an election by acclaim of Ralph himself. None of the boys could have found good reason for this; what intelligence had been shown was traceable to Piggy while the most obvious leader was Jack. But there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out: there was his size, and attractive appearance; and most obscurely, yet most powerfully, there was the conch. The being that had blown that, had sat waiting for them on the platform with the delicate thing balanced on his knees, was set apart.

While Ralph looks like a leader, he is not a good thinker. He is interested in exploring and some of the more practical matters on the island, which is admirable; however, he is unable to motivate the boys to do anything they make plans to do. Piggy sticks with him (though he did not vote for him), but only because Piggy knows Jack hates him. 

Ralph eventually learns to listen to Piggy and comes to rely on him often; in fact, on his own he eventually comes to many of the same conclusions Piggy understood from the beginning. Unfortunately, a lot of valuable time is lost as Ralph tries to work with Jack instead of fighting against Jack's eventual takeover of the island. Ralph accepts his leadership role, but the role did not really suit him for some time. By the time he kind of figures it out, it is too late.

When Ralph is elected leader, Jack is deflated. He claims he should be chief because he was already the head choirboy (a position he got because he can sing a high C), but he is clearly not a good leader since his choir only votes for him under duress. Jack is consumed with his own desire to hunt and kill, giving little thought and no concern to any other necessary provisions, such as the shelters or the signal fire. He does get more boys to join his tribe, but that is not because he is a benevolent or wise leader; he either bribes them by providing food or takes them by force.

In the end, neither boy is a great leader. Ralph certainly has more concern for his followers and a more developed conscience. Though he makes mistakes along the way, he obviously has a clear understanding of right and wrong and has compassion for others. While Ralph is a good leader in terms of his humanity and morality, Jack might have to be considered a more effective leader for one simple reason: at the end of the novel, every boy but Ralph has joined his tribe. Whatever his methods, he commands his savages and, if the ship does not arrive to rescue the boys, he would have been sole leader of the boys on the island. He is chief of the savages, but he has a tribe. 

If "better" is based on numbers alone, Jack wins the title. If "better" is based on character and morality, Ralph is the clear-cut winner, though eventually he has no one to lead--which is rather the point Golding was trying to make.

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Who is the more effective leader between Ralph and Jack in Lord of the Flies?

Jack is used to being a leader and feels he needs to be the leader of the boys. But, Jack can also be a bully, seen in the way he treats Piggy. Jack doesn't see the need for organization and planning. He wants to prove himself to be a worthy leader, so he must confront his fears and overcome them if he wants the other boys to follow him. Jack makes rules, but he enforces them physically. The rules are for Jack's purposes only and not for the good of the group. He wants the other boys to see him as a fearless leader and uses intimidation to get the others to do what he says. These are not the attributes of a good leader.

Ralph is different from Jack. He takes his leadership seriously and is concerned with taking care of things he considers to be essential, such as constructing shelters and keeping the fire burning so a ship can find them. He's hurt and angry when Jack rebels and pulls the other boys into his own group.As the tensions grow between the two boys, this forces Ralph to sink to Jack's level and become physical . Ralph symbolizes civilization, while Jack is savagery.

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How does Ralph and Jack's leadership compare in Lord of the Flies?

Jack has the advantage of being tall; his direction of the choir is another sign of an "obvious leader." As a political animal, however, Jack recognizes that choir conducting won't get him far on a deserted island. His decision to turn the choir into a group of hunters with himself as leader shows that he can be a wily strategist. In other ways, however, Jack is careless and destructive, as when he accidentally steps on Piggy's glasses and breaks a lens.

 Nevertheless, Jack is successful in daring Ralph to come with him to hunt the mysterious beast when darkness is falling. On that hunt Jack and Ralph, joined by Roger, perceive through the falling darkness the dim, shrouded figure of the dead parachutist—an image of the adult world that suggests the destruction of the rational society envisioned by Ralph and Piggy.

As Ralph has a "directness" in his manner that the narrator calls a sign of "genuine leadership." As E. M. Forster describes Ralph in an introduction to one of the novel's editions, he is "sunny and decent, sensible and considerate."  Jack's savage society becomes more distinct and powerful. Jack separates his group from Ralph's when the group fails to dethrone Ralph and recognize Jack as leader. Then Jack sets about wooing away the other boys to his group.

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In Lord of the Flies, how is Ralph a better leader than Jack?

Okay, so first of all, let's address how to answer this question so that you are making an argument, not summarizing the book. 

Making an argument: Summary would be a statement like "Ralph is better leader than Jack when he does x and x." This is considered summary because all you are doing is stating a belief and then listing things that happen. The best way to avoid summary and actually make your argument is with one simple word: because. By using "because" in a statement, you are making it into a cause-effect situation: "Ralph is a better leader than Jack because x." Now, in your argument, you must prove that this is true!

Using the evidence: The quotation you have been asked to use is from the 4th chapter. In this scene, Ralph and Piggy noticed from the beach that the fire has gone out, and they run to the signal spot. When they get there, it's been abandoned, but they are quickly joined by the "hunters", led by a triumphant Jack. Instead of commenting on the carcass that Jack is carrying, which will be food, Ralph instead flatly states "You let the fire go out" (52).

You have to use this statement to prove that Ralph is better at leading than Jack; what is significant here is the conflicting value systems between the two leaders. Jack, as a leader, has been successful in attaining a short-term goal: food. Ralph, as a leader, has been unsuccessful in attaining a long-term goal. Now, for your argument, which favors Ralph, you can compare their goals and explain to your reader that although Ralph has been unsuccessful, his goal has a wider scope and greater implications than Jack's. Although Jack has been successful, his leadership will never get the boys off of the island, and Ralph's will. 

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How do Ralph and Jack use their power differently in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph tries to be a leader in order to get things done, and Jack wants to be a leader to get personal power.

 

Ralph is chosen leader almost immediately, because he makes the first move of leadership on the island when he blows the conch.  The conch seems to imbue him with special powers.  The boys are confident in him because he has the conch, even though Jack is the more obvious leader and Piggy is the only one who shows intelligence.

 

Ralph is not a capable leader, however.  He simply can’t get the boys to listen to him.  They only get two shelters built, and they keep letting the fire out.  Eventually, the boys break into two factions, and Jack takes most of the older ones.

Jack seems more interested in violence and power from the start.  When the boys are voting, he is most interested in having rules because of what he can do to those who break them.  We later see that he does not need someone to break the rules to get physical.

“…He got angry and made us tie Wilfred up.

He’s been”—he giggled excitedly—“he’s been tied for hours, waiting—”

“But didn’t the chief say why?”

“I never heard him.” (ch 10)

Jack is a heathen.  His hunters are bloodthirsty, and move from killing pigs to killing kids.  They lose themselves in the anonymity of anarchy, and soon enough there is little civilization left.

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