How do the article "Throwing like a girl" by James Fallows and the "Sam Gordon: Nine-Year-old Girl Football Sensation" video compare?

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Read/viewed together, it's almost as if Fallows' article is a theory or a hypothesis and the video of Sam Gordon is the experiment and evidence proving the theory that "throwing like a girl" is not based on gender. If a man or woman "throws like a girl" ("throws poorly" is more appropriate), it is because of a lack of practice. The purpose of the article and the response to the video is to confirm this theory that a girl or boy can learn to throw well. If you want to put this into context or a discussion area, I would say the article and the video could be discussed in the context of men and women in sports and the context of (challenging) gender bias.

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There are some obvious advantages to video.  Video allows you to actually see things, where a print article can only describe them.  The advantage to a print article is that distribution is easier.  Another main advantage of an article is that you can get more information, and more sophisticated information, such as this.

 Recently, on the heels of the O. J. Simpson case, a book appeared in which the phrase was used to help explain why male athletes, especially football players, were involved in so many assaults against women. (theatlantic.com)

The video, on the other hand, is more sensationalized.  It focuses on the “interest” factor, and is less serious than the article about the social ramifications of a girl being able to throw a football.  Yet each piece serves its purpose, and together they tell a very interesting story about America and its feelings on gender and sports.

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