Summary

Jayne Anne Phillips’s Lark and Termite concerns a set of interrelated characters in West Virginia and Korea in the 1950s. Phillips shifts between two locations: a tunnel beneath a railway bridge at the start of the Korean War in 1950, where twenty-one-year-old Corporal Robert Leavitt is trapped with a mob of refugees being fired upon by confused American troops, and Winfield, West Virginia, 1959, where an unconventional family that includes Leavitt’s autistic son rides out a torrential flood.

Lark and Termite features an epigraph from William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. The novel recalls Faulkner’s both in its reliance on a mentally impaired character and in its use of multiple points of view. Phillips moves between the perspectives of Leavitt; Leavitt’s autistic son, Termite; Termite’s half-sister, Lark; and Lark and Termite’s aunt, Nonie.

Robert Leavitt has arrived in Korea by way of Japan, where he played trumpet in an army band before being chosen to join a group of American servicemen in an intensive Korean language program. A month after the surprise invasion of South Korea by North Korea, Leavitt is guiding a large mass of refugees from an evacuated village when they are fired upon by American airplanes, who are under the assumption that refugees have been infiltrated by North Korean soldiers. In the chaos of the firefight, Leavitt helps a Korean girl who is traveling with a blind boy, probably her brother, and an older woman. Leavitt flees with the refugees into a tunnel—but not before he is mortally wounded by gunfire in his legs and back.

As Leavitt marches with the refugees and after he becomes trapped in the tunnel, his mind reaches back to his life in America—specifically his youth in Philadelphia and his time on base in Fort Knox, Kentucky. While at Fort Knox, Leavitt visits nearby Louisville, where he plays trumpet in a jazz band at a club and brothel run by Bill Onslow. Leavitt falls in love with the jazz band’s lead singer, a thirty-year-old woman from West Virginia named Lola. Three weeks before Leavitt ships out to Asia, Lola tells him she is pregnant with his child, and they marry. As Leavitt fades in and out of consciousness, he hears Lola speaking to him. Leavitt knows their baby is due any day now, and he believes he will somehow know when Lola gives birth.

Interspersed with Leavitt’s story is the story of the title characters, Lark and Termite, and their life in Winfield, West Virginia, exactly nine years after Leavitt’s death in Korea. Termite is Leavitt’s son; he is a mentally impaired boy who does not communicate or walk but has a preternatural ability to mimic the words of those around him. His older sister, Lark, is Lola’s daughter from an earlier relationship. Lark and Termite live with their aunt, Nonie, who is Lola’s sister. Lark is Termite’s principal caregiver while Nonie is away at work, and the siblings share a special connection. Others disagree...

(The entire section is 1213 words.)