How does Afghan culture impact the relationship between Amir and Sohrab in The Kite Runner?

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Sohrab was the son of Hassan, who in turn was (or, at least was believed to be) the son of Ali, a lowly Hazara. Hazaras were considered inferior to the other Afghan people (particularly the Pashtun, of which Baba and Amir were members), and mixing with them was frowned upon by Afghan society. General Taheri ridiculed the idea of Sohrab joining the family of Amir and Soraya until Amir made it clear he would no longer allow such behavior from his father-in-law. On the other hand, it was Amir's confession that he had returned to Afghanistan to find his Hazara half-nephew that most impressed his driver, Farid, who only then agreed to accompany Amir wholeheartedly on his quest. 

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One thought that occurs to me is that there was a culture of honor among Afghans, and so Amir's rescue of Sohrab might have reflected that aspect of the culture.  But the other thought that occurs to me is that the story is meant to show us the sad deterioration of Afghan culture at the hands of the Taliban, who clearly destroyed the beauty of life in Afghanistan.  You might even say that Sorhab is a symbol of all that went wrong with Afghan culture.  Of course, had Sorhab been living a good life, Amir would not necessarily have felt the need to rescue him, we wouldn't have the wonderful symmetry of that rescue, matching up with the beginning of the book, and Amir would not have found redemption. 

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Sohrab is Hassan’s son.  Amir tries to make up for his relationship with Hassan by taking care of Sohrab.  Sohrab represents his second chance.  He has done things to look out for himself, but he tries to look after Sohrab.  When he fails and Sohrab he will need to go to the orphanage temporarily, Sohrab tries to commit suicide.  Like Hassan, Sohrab never blames Amir for anything.

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