Julia Slavin Analysis

Other Literary Forms

Julia Slavin began work on a novel shortly after the publication of The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club, her first book.

Achievements

Julia Slavin has published short stories in a number of well-respected literary journals. She won a Pushcart Prize and the Frederick Exley Fiction Award, both in 1999.

Bibliography

Lewis, Nicole. “Outer Suburbia: Julia Slavin’s Stories Chart Some Very Unfamiliar Territory.” The Washington Post,September 15, 1999, p. C01. A feature article on Slavin and her book. Provides some useful background information on the writer as well as comments from Slavin on the writing of the book.

Pakenham, Michael. “Debut Stories by Julia Slavin: Deliciously Insane.” Review of The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club, by Julia Slavin. The Baltimore Sun, July 25, 1999, p. 10F. Another reviewer noting the fantastic, surreal, and dreamlike quality of the stories. Calls the book “wonderfully strong, delightfully readable stuff.”

Reynolds, Susan Salter. “Voyage to the Future of Fiction.” Review of The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club, by Julia Slavin. Newsday, July 18, 1999, p. B12. Reviews The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club in the context of contemporary fiction. Argues that the stories exhibit “a quietly desperate, normalized insanity that has a brave tradition in literature.”

Rosenfeld, Lucinda. “Down and Dirty.” Harper’s Bazaar (July, 1999): 144. Rosenfeld traces male-female relationships in several works of contemporary fiction, including The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club. Suggests that Slavin’s characters “find their internal malaise mirrored in the external world.”

Taylor, Charles. “Nightmares on Elm Street.” The New York Times Book Review (August 15, 1999): 7. Taylor comments on Slavin’s notion of the grotesque and points out that Slavin’s subject is the fear and anxiety of contemporary life.

Wittman, Juliet. “Storied Presents: Two Collections.” Reviews The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club, by Julia Slavin. The Washington Post, September 9, 1999, p. C2. A review of The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club that calls Slavin “a major discovery.” Notes the surreal, fantastic qualities of the stories and suggests that Slavin could be compared to Franz