Jean Fritz

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Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 189

Crestview [in "Henry 3"] is the Establishment; it is Suburbia, the perfect backdrop for a man like Henry Lovering's father, ripe for a vice-presidency. Crestview is a place where survival itself depends on cultivating the right people. This, as it turns out, does not include Fletcher Larkin and his father….

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Crestview [in "Henry 3"] is the Establishment; it is Suburbia, the perfect backdrop for a man like Henry Lovering's father, ripe for a vice-presidency. Crestview is a place where survival itself depends on cultivating the right people. This, as it turns out, does not include Fletcher Larkin and his father….

Although Henry has a great time as a member of the most in-group, eventually he comes to see the phoniness…. And what can a young man do at the end of such a book? There is no place to go since Crestview is not an isolated community; it is every community. About all Henry can do is to leave the future open.

Unfortunately the story and characterization are not wholly convincing, sometimes verging on caricature, sometimes naiveté. One remembers the satisfying stories and subtle, many-sided characters Mr. Krumgold has created in the past in two Newbery Award books and regrets that, although the theme of the present book is provocative, the story is presented in such black and white terms. (p. 40)

Jean Fritz, in The New York Times Book Review (© 1967 by The New York Times Company; reprinted by permission), October 8, 1967.

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