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Jane Eyre's portrayal as a strong and determined female character

Summary:

Jane Eyre is portrayed as a strong and determined female character through her resilience, independence, and moral integrity. Despite facing numerous hardships, including a harsh childhood and challenging social norms, she remains steadfast in her principles and pursues her own path. Her courage to assert herself and make difficult choices, such as leaving Mr. Rochester when her values are compromised, exemplifies her strength and determination.

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Is Jane portrayed as a strong and determined character in Jane Eyre?

There are several examples of Jane's strong and determined character n the novel. One is that she doesn't become consumed by anger and rebellion despite her appalling experiences in the household in which she grew up and at the boarding school she attended. She realises that survival will mean conformity, humility and exercising upright principles. We see her strength clearly come through again when she refuses to take up Mr Rotchester's offer of moving to France to be his mistress. She resolves to leave the situation altogether, despite the fact that it will leave her destitute.

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Is Jane portrayed as a strong and determined character in Jane Eyre?

Jane is a strong woman, and one of the pieces of evidence for this is her reaction to Mr. Rochester.  She does not back down.  She holds her own in conversations, not at all typical for a Victorian woman.  Consider when Rochester asks her to marry him, even though he is married.

“Do you doubt me, Jane?”
“Entirely.”
“You have no faith in me?”
“Not a whit.” (ch 23, p. 184)

Although this is funny, it is also a good example of her strength and strength of character.  She is not willing to be a mistress, but she is also able to speak her mind. She does not let his status, her status, or the fact that he is a man to intimidate her.

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How is Jane Eyre portrayed as a strong female character in the novel?

Like everyone else, Jane cannot have complete control over the events of her life, but she can exert a fair measure of control over herself. That’s precisely what she does throughout the story that bears her name, and it’s what makes her such a strong female character.

In Jane’s day, women were very much under the control of their menfolk. Whatever property they brought to a marriage, for instance, was immediately appropriated by their husbands. Women had few legal or civil rights; they were expected to be demure and display deference towards men.

That being the case, it’s all the more remarkable that Jane should show such extraordinary resilience and integrity right throughout the novel. Many women in her situation might have married the drippy but respectable St. John Rivers for the sake of outward appearances. But Jane is a young lady who follows the dictates of her heart. She cannot and will not marry someone whom she doesn’t love.

Jane only has eyes for Mr. Rochester, but even so, she still stands up to him, insisting that she won’t allow him to make her a glorified concubine. Rochester effectively tries to inveigle Jane into an act of bigamy. As well as being a serious criminal offense, this represents an assault on Jane’s very strict moral standards. Jane’s morality and integrity are such that she is determined not to be a petted plaything; she will be Rochester’s equal or nothing. Ultimately, her standing firm pays off, and she and Rochester are able to be together in a marriage both legal and respectable.

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How is Jane Eyre portrayed as a strong female character in the novel?

Jane Eyre is a coming-of-age story that follows young Jane, an orphan living with her aunt as she adjusts to life in a dismal boarding school and accepts her first position as a governess in a nearby family estate. After finding comfort in her position and after falling in love with the owner of the estate, shocking revelations cause her to flee the home and seek a new life. Ultimately, she is reunited with her love, Edward Rochester, but not before she proves her own independence and discovers the value of her own perspective.

Jane exhibits her strength in several points throughout her journey. As a child, she stands up for herself when her cousins abuse her and lie about her to their mother. This insistence upon the truth ironically earns her the reputation of being a liar, and her aunt, as well as her teacher at Lowood, condemns her for not being more submissive. While at Lowood, Jane meets Helen, a sickly classmate who teaches her the value of forgiveness and humility in the face of injustice, taking Jesus as an example of the power of love over vengeance. After Helen's death, Jane dedicates herself to imitating Helen's disposition, and in the remainder of the novel, she is noticeably more reserved in her passions, although she is no less resolute.

After Jane leaves Lowood and becomes a governess at Thornfield Hall, she falls in love with Edward Rochester, an older wealthy man who has had experiences with many different kinds of women. Once their relationship begins, Jane proves herself to be more than a trophy to Rochester, rejecting his lavish gifts and ridiculous pet names and insisting on his respect and consideration. Her resolution is strongly tested when she learns that Rochester has not only been previously married, his wife is still living in a secret room in the very house where she has been working. Rochester offers her every temptation to reject tradition, reject religion, reject convention, and reject the opinions of her friends at Thornfield. He begs for her to live with him and to be his partner in all things even though they cannot be legally married. Jane chooses instead to leave Thornfield out of respect for herself, and she runs away, slipping out of the window at night in pursuit of a new life. With no prospects of work or shelter, she ventures out, trusting God to guide her.

In her new situation, Jane is taken in by some kindly strangers, who she later discovers are her lost relatives. One of the strangers, St. John Rivers, offers to marry her. But this would be a marriage of convenience, a way for them to travel together doing missionary work with no involvement of emotional attachment unless the Lord inspired some love between them. This disgusts Jane. She is still very passionate, even if Rivers has not noticed yet, and the idea of a loveless marriage goes against everything she hopes for herself. She rejects Rivers's offer, again insisting on her perspective rather than submitting to a man who wishes to change her. This decision prompts her to return to Thornfield and to Rochester, whose wife has since died. They are able to marry, and her commitment to her ideals is rewarded with a loving, happy marriage.

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How does Charlotte Bronte portray Jane Eyre as a remarkable woman of her time?

Charlotte Bronte creates Jane Eyre to be an interesting female character. Jane is not made to be the typical Gothic woman in this novel.She has a sense of self, and she uses her intelligence and independence in her decisions rather than being submissive and helpless.

Jane is not gullible, as she has good judgement in terms of assessing people's character. She realizes that appearances are not necessarily the reality of matters, and she pays the price for the ability to realize this.

Jane is not obstinate, but she is not afraid to speak her mind or confront uncomfortable issues. She uses restraint and sense with regards to romantic issues, such as refusing to become just a mistress to Rochester, or turning down St. John Rivers marriage proposal.

Jane is a refreshing female character from the typical Gothic woman, whose sappy and melodramatic attitude define their characters.

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