James Joyce Additional Biography

Biography

(Critical Guide to Censorship and Literature)

Joyce was born into a Roman Catholic Irish family. His early life was molded by the conservative religious and moral values of late Victorian Ireland as well as the nationalistic passions that led to Ireland’s independence from Great Britain in 1922. He left the church in his late teens and exiled himself from Ireland after 1904, only rarely to return. Nevertheless, he never escaped his Irish and his Catholic background, which formed the core of the subject matter in his short stories and novels.

At his preparatory school Joyce was incensed when books were locked up and restricted. While at the university in Dublin he wrote an essay criticizing the parochialism of Irish-language drama that was censured by the university authorities because it mentioned an author listed in the church’s Index Librorum Prohibitorum. Refusing to accept the censure, Joyce published the essay privately.

While living in Italy with his future wife, Nora Barnacle, Joyce wrote a series of short stories about Dublin life. Dubliners was later recognized as a brilliant work, but Joyce faced considerable difficulties in getting it published. The first English printer he approached objected that his book contained immoral passages contravening English law. In contrast to Ireland after independence, England had no censorship board to pass judgement on literary works before their publication, but offending works could be prosecuted after publication....

(The entire section is 491 words.)

Biography

(Literary Essentials: Short Fiction Masterpieces)

James Augustine Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, the eldest child of John Stanislaus and Mary Jane (May) Murray Joyce. The family was typical of the growing ranks of the Irish Catholic middle class of the day, socially confident, politically optimistic, though less than well established economically. During Joyce’s early years, however, the family remained in comfortable circumstances, and at the age of six, Joyce was enrolled in Clongowes Wood College, an elite Jesuit boarding school outside Dublin. After two years at Clongowes, Joyce’s education was interrupted because of a decline in family fortunes, the result in large part of John Joyce’s improvidence. In 1893, Joyce began to attend Belvedere College, another Jesuit...

(The entire section is 633 words.)

Biography

(Survey of Novels and Novellas)

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 2, 1882, the first of John Joyce and Mary Murray’s ten children. During the years of Joyce’s youth, his father wasted the family’s substantial resources based on properties in Cork City; Joyce, at the same time, grew to reject the pious Catholicism of his mother. Except for a brief period, his education was in the hands of the Jesuits: at Clongowes Wood College, the less exclusive Belvedere College, and finally at University College, Dublin, from which he graduated in 1902. Joyce quickly outgrew his mentors, however, so that the early influences of the Maynooth Catechism and Saints Ignatius Loyola and Thomas Aquinas yielded to his own eclectic reading in...

(The entire section is 622 words.)

Biography

(British and Irish Poetry, Revised Edition)

The life of James Augustine Aloysius Joyce is interwoven so inextricably with his work that to consider one requires considering the other. The definitive biography of Joyce, by Richard Ellmann, is as strong in its interpretation of Joyce’s work as it is of his life. If Joyce, as Ellmann suggests in that biography, tended to see things through words, readers must try to see him through his words—the words of his work—as well as through the facts of his life.

Joyce was born into a family whose fortunes were in decline, the first child to live in the match of a man who drank too much and accumulated too many debts and a woman whose family the Joyces considered beneath them. John Joyce, James’s father, became the...

(The entire section is 1035 words.)

Biography

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

James Augustine Joyce was born into a respectable, if improvident, middle-class family in Dublin, Ireland, on February 2, 1882. He was sent to Clongowes Wood College, a Jesuit boarding school, at the age of six; he entered Belvedere College in 1893. In 1898, he entered another Jesuit institution, University College, Dublin. Joyce was an excellent student but his rebellious nature was becoming clear after he published “The Day of the Rabblement,” an attack on the new Irish theater, and refused to sign a petition against the heresy in William Butler Yeats’s “Countess Cathleen.”

Joyce went to Paris in 1902 to study medicine but had to return to Ireland in 1903 when his mother was dying. During this period, he...

(The entire section is 677 words.)

Biography

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

James Joyce is a preeminent modernist writer and a great innovator. He altered forever the way the world thinks of fiction. He added a subtlety to the well-plotted short story, provided a richness of detail and an intensity to the central consciousness of the novel of education, and turned the novel into an epic, a form capable of including diverse materials and styles. He did nothing less than transform modern literature.

Biography

(Great Authors of World Literature, Critical Edition)

James Joyce became an international symbol of the modern experimental writer during his lifetime, and since then his reputation as one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century has been securely established. Despite the great range and almost universal significance of his works, which became larger in scope and more experimental in language and structure as his career progressed, all are deeply rooted in the city of Dublin, where Joyce was born, in 1882, yet from which he exiled himself for his entire adult life.

Joyce was educated in Jesuit day schools and then University College, Dublin, where he studied modern languages. In 1904 he went to Europe with Nora Barnacle; they had two children and later married....

(The entire section is 1015 words.)

Biography

(Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

James Joyce was born on February 2,1882, the oldest of ten children born to John and Mary Joyce. Joyce's father, though a good-natured man,...

(The entire section is 471 words.)

Biography

(Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

James Joyce is one of the most celebrated and influential English-language writers of the twentieth century, and his later works of fiction,...

(The entire section is 1296 words.)

Biography

(Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

James Joyce is one of the most celebrated and influential English-language writers of the twentieth century, and his later works of fiction,...

(The entire section is 1396 words.)

Biography

(Novels for Students)

Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland. He was the eldest child of John Stanislaus and Mary Jane Murray Joyce, who had,...

(The entire section is 663 words.)

Biography

(Short Stories for Students)

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born the oldest of eight children on February 2,1882, in Rathgar, a suburb of Dublin, Ireland. His parents...

(The entire section is 506 words.)

Biography

(Short Stories for Students)

James Joyce, the eldest of ten children, some of whom did not survive childhood, was born on February 2, 1882. While still a child, Joyce’s...

(The entire section is 850 words.)

Biography

(Novels for Students)

James Augustine Joyce was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 2, 1882, the eldest of ten children of John Stanislaus Joyce and Mary Jane...

(The entire section is 474 words.)