James De Mille Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Davies, Gwendolyn. “An Introduction to James DeMille's ‘Inaugural Discourse’ of 1861.” University of Toronto Quarterly 64, no. 3 (summer 1995): 431-43.

Provides a brief background and overview of De Mille's 1861 “Inaugural Discourse” at Acadia College, delivered at the commencement of his academic post. Includes full text of address.

Kilian, Crawford. “The Cheerful Inferno of James De Mille.” Journal of Canadian Fiction 1, no. 3 (summer 1972): 61-7.

Summarizes the author's personal and professional life, offers possibilities as to the literary influences for De Mille's Utopian satire, and speculates on its date of composition.

Kime, Wayne R. “The American Antecedents of James De Mille's A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder.Dalhousie Review 55, no. 2 (summer 1975): 280-306.

Compares A Strange Manuscript with the writings of three American authors—William H. Prescott, Herman Melville, and Edgar Allan Poe—demonstrating how De Mille reacted to, changed, or otherwise ignored textual ideas from these literary predecessors.

Lamont-Stewart, Linda. “Rescued by Postmodernism: The Escalating Value of James De Mille's A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder.Canadian Literature 145 (summer 1995): 21-36.

Illustrates how the critical readings of A Strange Manuscript were transformed during the course of the twentieth century as the development of a postmodernistic aesthetic altered the direction of Canadian literary studies.

Multineddu, Flavio. “A Tendentious Game with an Uncanny Riddle: A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder.Canadian Literature 145 (summer 1995): 62-81.

Compares the external audience's questioning of genre-assignment in the novel with the similar role played by the four internal readers of the papyrus manuscript.

Parks, M. G. “Strange to Strangers Only.” Canadian Literature 70 (1976): 61-78.

Surveys the critical history, composition date, and textual sources for A Strange Manuscript, examining the manner in which De Mille's family background and religious convictions influenced his writing of the novel.

Additional coverage of De Mille's life and career is contained in the following source published by the Gale Group: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vol. 99.