Jacques de Vitry Criticism - Essay

Alfred J. Andrea (essay date June 1981)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Andrea, Alfred J. “Walter, Archdeacon of London, and the Historia Occidentalis of Jacques de Vitry.” Church History 50, no. 2 (June 1981): 144-51.

[In the following essay, Andrea confirms the validity of Jacques's reference to Master Walter of London, an archdeacon and influential preacher.]

Jacques de Vitry's Historia Occidentalis is one of the more remarkable and informative studies of contemporary western Christendom to come out of the thirteenth century.1 As numerous commentators have pointed out, it is unmistakably the product of the spiritual-intellectual school of Master Peter the Chanter of Paris, who inspired a generation...

(The entire section is 5332 words.)

Leigh A. Arrathoon (essay date 1984)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Arrathoon, Leigh A. “Jacques de Vitry, the Tale of Calogrenant, La Chastelaine de Vergi, and the Genres of Medieval Narrative Fiction.” In The Craft of Fiction: Essays in Medieval Poetics, edited by Leigh A. Arrathoon, pp. 281-368. Rochester, Mich.: Solaris Press, 1984.

[In the following excerpt, Arrathoon discusses and analyzes a preaching exemplum by Jacques in the context of medieval fiction that is ethically oriented.]

Tria sunt item, quae praestare debeat orator ut doceat, moveat, delectat.

Quintilian, Institutionis Oratoriae, 3. 5. 2.

In the third book of his...

(The entire section is 11441 words.)

Carolyn A. Muessig (essay date 1998)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Muessig, Carolyn A. “Audience and Sources in Jacques de Vitry's Sermones Feriales et Communes.” In Medieval Sermons and Society: Cloister, City, University, edited by Jacqueline Hamesse, Beverly Mayne Kienzle, Debra L. Stoudt, and Anne T. Thayer, pp. 183-202. Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium: Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales, 1998.

[In the following essay, Muessig discusses the themes of Jacques's sermons, explaining that they were originally intended for clerics.]

Jacques de Vitry's (c. 1160-1240) dedication to preaching, reform, and pastoral care attracted him to various places. He studied in Paris and was a product of...

(The entire section is 7411 words.)

Cynthia Ho (essay date 1998)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Ho, Cynthia. “Corpus Delicti: The Edifying Dead in the Exempla of Jacques de Vitry.” In Medieval Sermons and Society: Cloister, City, University, edited by Jacqueline Hamesse, Beverly Mayne Kienzle, Debra L. Stoudt, and Anne T. Thayer, pp. 203-18. Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium: Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales, 1998.

[In the following essay, Ho discusses Jacques's understanding of the relationship between body and soul, both in life and in death, and examines his views on women as seen in his sermons.]

Scholars of medieval literature and history are increasingly turning to the numerous surviving sermon collections...

(The entire section is 6249 words.)

Jessalynn Bird (review date 1999)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Bird, Jessalynn. Review of Orient und Okzident nach den Hauptwerken des Jakob von Vitry, by Ilse Schöndorfer. Revue Belge de Philologie et d'Histoire 77, no. 4 (1999): 1098-1103.

[In the following review, Bird praises Ilse Schöndorfer's book on Jacques, particularly her attempt to provide a comprehensive study of Jacques's views, but criticizes the author for insufficiently considering the context of his works.]

Many historians have mined James of Vitry's historical and homiletic works for colorful anecdotes while ignoring the moral imperatives which informed his descriptions. His jeremiadic decrial of contemporary abuses and sanguine hopes for the...

(The entire section is 3137 words.)

Debra J. Birch (essay date 1999)

(Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism)

SOURCE: Birch, Debra J. “Jacques de Vitry and the Ideology of Pilgrimage.” In Pilgrimage Explored, edited by J. Stopford, pp. 79-93. York, England: York Medieval Press, 1999.

[In the following essay, Birch analyzes two sermons Jacques wrote specifically for Christian pilgrims.]

Enthusiasm for pilgrimage amongst the peoples of Christendom remained unabated throughout the medieval period. Journeys to the tomb or shrine of a saint or martyr, or a visit to some other holy place, were readily undertaken by men and women, young and old, rich and poor alike. Some travelled only as far as a local holy place, while others ventured much further afield. For the majority of...

(The entire section is 7514 words.)