J. F. Powers Long Fiction Analysis - Essay

J. F. Powers Long Fiction Analysis

J. F. Powers was an idealist; he also was a moralist. The two attitudes need not necessarily be incorporated in a single person, but they naturally combine when, as is the case with Powers, the ideal is perceived to be something that is to not only be admired but also sought. The vision of the pure idealist tends to be illuminated chiefly by aesthetic considerations; a discrepancy between the ideal and the real is seen primarily as an artistic failure. For the idealist-moralist, on the other hand, the discrepancy between the ideal and the real, while it can profitably be seen in aesthetic terms, is essentially a matter of morality. To call Powers an idealist is not to say that he was a perfectionist. Falling short of the ideal is,...

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