Invisible Man Chapter 17 Questions and Answers

Ralph Ellison

Chapter 17 Questions and Answers

Study Questions
1. What is the name of the Harlem bar in which the narrator and Brother Jack have their drinks?

2. What does the narrator answer when Brother Jack asks what he thinks of Brother Hambro as a teacher?

3. How does the narrator respond when Brother Jack tells him that he will be the chief spokesman for the Harlem office?

4. What idea does the narrator have to keep eviction protests important to the Brotherhood’s agenda?

5. What does one of the men with Ras call the narrator during the street fight?

6. What does the narrator do to Ras to protect Clifton?

7. What does Ras say that Clifton would have been in Africa?

8. After leaving behind Ras, what does the narrator say he is suddenly very glad that he found?

9. Of whose voice does the narrator remember echoes when he looks at the picture of Frederick Douglass?

10. What does the narrator remember that he has in common with Frederick Douglass?

Answers
1. The name of the Harlem bar in which the narrator and Brother Jack have their drinks is El Toro.

2. When Brother Jack asks the narrator what the latter thinks of Brother Hambro as a teacher, the narrator says that Brother Hambro pushed him hard, and that he (the narrator) certainly has learned a few things.

3. The narrator had been impatiently waiting for the next phase of his career with the Brotherhood and is surprised and elated.

4. The narrator’s idea for keeping eviction protests in the forefront of the Brotherhood’s agenda is to enlist the help of community leaders.

5. During the street fight, one of the men calls the narrator an “Uncle Tom,” meaning a person who loves his oppressors.

6. To protect Clifton, the narrator hits Ras with a pipe on the man’s knife hand.

7. Ras says that, in Africa, Clifton would have been a chief, a black king.

8. After leaving behind Ras, the narrator says that he is suddenly very glad that he has found the Brotherhood.

9. When the narrator looks at the picture of Frederick Douglass he remembered and shut out the echoes of his grandfather’s voice.

10. The narrator remembers that Frederick Douglass came from the South to the North, and changed his name, just as the narrator himself has done.