Invisible Man Chapter 14 Questions and Answers

Ralph Ellison

Chapter 14 Questions and Answers

Study Questions
1. What changes the narrator’s mind about calling Brother Jack?

2. What is the name of the expensive-looking building to which Brother Jack takes the narrator?

3. How does the narrator describe the apartment where he meets the other Brotherhood members, including Emma?

4. What drink does the narrator ask for?

5. What does Emma say that offends the narrator?

6. With what was Brother Jack so impressed?

7. Describe the narrator’s reaction when Brother Jack suggests that the narrator could be the next Booker T. Washington.

8. To whom does the narrator compare Booker T. Washington?

9. What does Emma challenge the narrator to do?

10. About what does the narrator feel guilty at the end of the chapter?

Answers
1. Literally speaking, the smell of cabbage changes the narrator’s mind about calling Brother Jack. In the larger sense, the realization that he needs money changes the narrator’s mind regarding whether or not to call Brother Jack.

2. The name of the expensive-looking building to which Brother Jack takes the narrator is Chothian, which means “of the underworld.”

3. The narrator describes the apartment where he meets the other Brotherhood members, including Emma, as expensive. It holds many books, musical instruments, and fine furniture. In another room there are lush draperies and a grand piano.

4. The narrator asks for and is given bourbon.

5. The narrator is offended to hear Emma ask whether the narrator should not, ideally, be a little blacker.

6. As he tells the Brotherhood members at Emma’s apartment, Brother Jack was very impressed by the narrator’s “speech” at the eviction.

7. The narrator’s reaction to Brother Jack’s idea is one of incredulity, and the narrator looks for humor in Brother Jack’s face.

8. The narrator compares Booker T. Washington to the Founder (the man who supposedly founded the college that the narrator attended).

9. Emma challenges the narrator to dance with her, and they dance.

10. At the end of the chapter, the narrator feels guilty about leaving Mary’s place. He feels that his decision will seem like ingratitude for her kindness and generosity.