Internment Chapters 22–28 Summary
by Samira Ahmed

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Chapters 22–28 Summary

Chapter 22

Layla and her friends’ table is called to take their food, but none of the teenagers rise. When Soheil announces that they are protesting the government’s violation of Muslims’ civil rights, the Director is furious. He lashes out and breaks Soheil’s nose. The Red Cross volunteers quickly create a barrier between the teens and the Director, who is held back by his own guards.

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Throngs of Exclusion Guards burst in the door, pushing people to the floor and breaking cell phones. Jake pulls Ayesha and Layla out of the confusion and turns to help others.

Outside the fence, the protesters and police look on as helicopters circle the premises, creating dust storms. Amid the screams and violence, Jake sees Layla unable to breathe and pulls her into her trailer. He washes her face and gives her water, stopping himself from holding her face in his hand.

Layla is in more danger now; the Director will blame her for riling up the others. Ali and Sophia lecture her on the danger of what she has done. Layla believes they are trying to mitigate the damage by portraying her on camera as a thoughtless teenager. They turn and go to their room, giving Layla the silent treatment.

Layla does not intend to die in captivity.

Chapter 23

All residents must now report at 6:30 a.m. for roll call. Their daily activities are precisely scheduled, and they have a 9 p.m. curfew. Saleem and Fauzia strictly enforce the roll call and urge everyone to cooperate or face consequences. A few people point out Layla to take the blame for their punishment. Fauzia and Ali intervene when Saleem threatens Layla.

Ayesha reports that the Red Cross has taken Soheil to a clinic to treat his injury. She is frightened that he will be a target if he returns. Just then, a man throws a hard clump of dirt, hitting Layla in the back.

Chapter 24

Three girls wearing hijab wish to join the movement, and Layla is impressed by their courage. She knows it takes great strength to maintain one’s identity.

The Director interrogates Layla with Red Cross representatives present. Layla recognizes an opportunity to expose the Director’s true self to the world and tries not to be intimidated by his demeanor. He accuses her of hurting people and disturbing their peaceful community. She retorts that she was not the one who broke Soheil’s nose and that they are prisoners in an internment camp.

The Director warns her that the Red Cross cannot help her, but he can. He offers her family a reward if she becomes his informant. He wants to know who organized the protest and who leaked stories to the outside world. She denies any knowledge. He informs her that Ali and Sophia have received threatening notes, which unnerves Layla; she has no intention of her parents suffering. The Director dismisses her after warning her that it would be better that they are friends when the Red Cross leaves.

Chapter 25

Jake introduces Layla to Specialist Fred Adams; the two have switched shifts in order to protect her. Jake becomes uncomfortable when Fred says they have an advantage because the others think Jake likes Layla. The shift switch gives Layla time to organize people for the next protest: a silent wall of solidarity next to the electrified fence. Someone suggests they also raise their right fists, a universal gesture of protest against racism and oppression.

One boy, Abdul, seems uncomfortable and expresses disbelief that girls in hijab would know anything about oppression, prompting one of the girls, Suraya, to tell him he’s ignorant. Layla warns them about fighting each other, which is just what the Director would want.

Chapter 26

Although they defend her to others, Layla’s parents hardly speak to her. They have heard about David’s Instagram video, and they know people blame her for the tight restrictions. Layla is saddened by the growing distance between her parents and herself, but she is also glad that they are somewhat protected. If they do not know what’s in her mind, they cannot be hurt.

Layla...

(The entire section is 1,310 words.)