Summary

(Critical Guide to British Fiction)

Bertie Wooster’s friend Richard “Bingo” Little is forever falling in love with a wide variety of women, and it is up to Bertie, with the aid of Jeeves, his valet, to promote or prevent these romances, depending on the suitability of the young lady. At the beginning of The Inimitable Jeeves, Bingo is infatuated with a waitress and wants Bertie to make his Uncle Mortimer, the source of his income, receptive to the idea. Jeeves suggests having Bingo read the uncle such Rosie M. Banks novels as Only a Factory Girl, in which “marriage with young persons of an inferior social status” is advocated. Bertie has to pretend that he writes the Banks novels to encourage Uncle Mortimer further. These machinations result in the uncle marrying his cook, previously Jeeves’s intended. Jeeves has been plotting for this eventuality since becoming friendly with the waitress Bingo loves.

Bingo next falls for Honoria Glossop, but Bertie’s domineering Aunt Agatha wants her nephew to marry Honoria. Deciding to get out of this jam without Jeeves’s help, Bertie pushes Honoria’s young brother into a pond so that Bingo can save the boy and be a hero in his beloved’s eyes, but on his way to the pond, fickle Bingo discovers someone else. Bertie finds himself engaged to Honoria, who says that he must get rid of Jeeves. The valet conspires with Claude and Eustace, Bertie’s prankster twin cousins, to convince Honoria’s father, Sir Roderick, a prominent psychiatrist, that Bertie is crazy.

Bingo dons a false beard and pretends to be a revolutionary to win the heart of gold-toothed Charlotte Corday Rowbotham. In the guise of...

(The entire section is 676 words.)

The Inimitable Jeeves Summary

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

Four Bertie and Jeeves stories are included in My Man Jeeves (1919), but The Inimitable Jeeves is the first book completely about these characters as Wodehouse weaves eleven previously published stories together to create a mostly unified narrative. The first true novel in the series is Thank You, Jeeves (1934).

Many of the loose strands of The Inimitable Jeeves are held together by the romantic travails of Bertie’s friend Bingo Little. Bingo is forever falling in love, and Bertie, with Jeeves’s assistance, either promotes the romance or attempts to prevent it, depending on the suitability of the young woman. At the beginning of the book, Bingo is infatuated with a waitress and wants Bertie to make his uncle, Lord Bittlesham, the source of Bingo’s income, receptive to Bingo’s marrying someone from the working class. Jeeves suggests having Bingo read the uncle such Rosie M. Banks novels as “Only a Factory Girl,” in which marriage to someone of lesser social status is advocated. As a result, Lord Bittlesham marries his cook.

Bingo next falls for Honoria Glossop, but Bertie’s domineering Aunt Agatha wants her nephew to marry Honoria. Attempting to resolve the problem without Jeeves’s help, Bertie pushes Honoria’s young brother into a pond so that Bingo can save the boy and appear heroic, but on his way to the pond, fickle Bingo discovers someone else. Bertie becomes engaged to Honoria, who...

(The entire section is 573 words.)

The Inimitable Jeeves Bibliography

(Critical Guide to British Fiction)

Donaldson, Frances. P. G. Wodehouse: A Biography, 1982.

Hall, Robert A., Jr. The Comic Style of P. G. Wodehouse, 1974.

Morris, J. H. C., and A. D. MacIntyre. Thank You, Wodehouse, 1981.

Voorhees, Richard J. P. G. Wodehouse, 1966.