Hugh Miller Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

BIOGRAPHIES

Bayne, Peter. The Life and Letters of Hugh Miller. 2 vols. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1871, 928 p.

Examines Miller's life and writings.

Leask, W. Keith. Hugh Miller. Edinburgh: Oliphant, Anderson & Ferrier, 1896, 157 p.

Comprehensive study of Miller's life and career as a writer and scientist.

Shortland, Michael. “Bonneted Mechanic and Narrative Hero: The Self-Modelling of Hugh Miller.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 14-75. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Psychological analysis of Miller.

Swiderski, Richard M. “Hugh Miller's Walk: Science, Folklore, and Suicide.” Soundings 66, no. 2 (summer 1983): 174-88.

Examines the circumstances surrounding Miller's death.

CRITICISM

Brooke, John Hedley. “Like Minds: The God of Hugh Miller.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 171-86. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Emphasizes the aesthetic aspects of Miller's writings on theology.

Gillispie, Charles Coulston. “The Vestiges of Creation.” In Genesis and Geology: A Study in the Relations of Scientific Thought, Natural Theology, and Social Opinion in Great Britain, 1790-1850, pp. 149-83. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1951.

Examination of the early nineteenth-century scientific debate on the progression of organic forms and Miller's contribution to the discourse.

Henry, John. “Palaeontology and Theodicy: Religion, Politics and the Asterolepis of Stromness.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 151-69. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Examines Miller's views on theology, science, and history.

Macleod, Donald. “Hugh Miller, the Disruption and the Free Church of Scotland.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 187-205. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Traces Miller's participation, as editor of the Non-Intrusion party's the Witness, in the debates revolving around the ideological schism in the Church of Scotland known as the Disruption.

Oldroyd, David R. “The Geologist from Cromarty.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 76-121. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Evaluates Miller's contributions to geology.

Porter, Roy. “Miller's Madness.” In Hugh Miller and the Controversies of Victorian Science, edited by Michael Shortland, pp. 265-86. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Relates Miller's madness as exemplified in his writings on his religious beliefs and nineteenth-century views on mental illness.

Additional coverage of Hugh Miller's life and career is contained in the following sources published by Thomson Gale: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vol. 190; and Literature Resource Center.