The Honest Whore, Parts I and II Essay - Further Critical Evaluation of the Work, Part 2 (Masterplots)

Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker

Further Critical Evaluation of the Work, Part 2 (Masterplots)

THE HONEST WHORE, PART TWO, continues in a more realistic, indeed often cynical fashion the story of THE HONEST WHORE, PART ONE. As is true of many literary sequels, in the second play Dekker changes his concept of the characters in order to satisfy the demands of his different plot. In PART ONE, Count Hippolito was the melancholy but faithful lover of Infelice; Gasparo Trebazzi was the inflexible father-tyrant who crossed the young lovers until the concluding scene; and Bellafront was the whore reformed through her unrequited but pure love for Hippolito. In PART TWO Hippolito, now married to Infelice, is no longer the melancholy saint of love: “turned ranger,” his passions are roused by Bellafront’s beauty; Gasparo is judicious instead of rancorous; and Bellafront is a model of wifely virtue, deaf to Hippolito’s seductive entreaties. Only Candido, the patient linen draper, remains quite the same in both plays. His “humor”—an exaggerated meekness and forbearance—is tested by his young skittish bride (his former wife Viola, the shrew, having fortunately expired), by pranksters, a bawd, a pander, and by assorted whores and knaves at Bridewell prison. The single important new character, Orlando Friscobaldo, who is Bellafront’s father, is intended to arouse in the audience sentimental affection, but his meretricious disguise and mean intrigues serve only to make his motivation appear inconsistent, and he is ultimately...

(The entire section is 531 words.)