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Themes in the book "Home"

Summary:

The book Home explores themes such as family, identity, and redemption. It delves into the complexities of familial relationships, the search for self-understanding, and the possibility of personal and communal healing. These themes are woven throughout the narrative, providing a rich exploration of what it means to find and create a sense of home.

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What is the main theme of Home?

Home by Toni Morrison tells the story of Frank Money, a Korean war veteran. It follows his life after he is discharged from the army. Frank is suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, has terrible flashbacks, and turns to drink.

One of the most significant themes in the novel is that of good vs evil. The theme can be identified at various points in the story. Mainly, however, it can be seen in the two opposing sides of Frank’s character. Whilst fighting in the war, he has not only seen great evil but has also committed it himself. He has killed many people, including a young Korean girl who used to give him oral sex. On his return, he struggles with what he has done but continues to do evil to himself by drinking and flying into great rages. When Frank flies into one of his rages, he does terrible things and cannot remember doing them. When he meets Lily, the good side of Frank emerges as he tries to be a better person. Frank’s good side is also seen in his relationship with his sister, Cee. Ultimately, though, the ‘evil’ side of Frank’s character re-emerges.

The theme of good vs evil can also be seen in the accounts of the Korean War, the actions of the opposing sides to each other, and the acts committed by Frank and the other soldiers.

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What is the main theme of Home?

I don't think it is appropriate to pick a singular main theme for this book. I believe that several main themes exist in the book, but picking a main theme is difficult to do because each important theme is going to resonate differently among various readers. This will cause individual readers to defend different themes as the "main" theme.

I think one theme that has to be mentioned deals with race and/or the African American experience during the 1950s. This theme is illustrated throughout the text because the protagonist of the story is a young black Korean War veteran named Frank Money. As a war veteran, readers get to see just how that war and combat have mentally and emotionally impacted him, so I feel a main theme also deals with war, violence, and the repercussions. Family and family bonds could also be a main theme because Frank Money is motivated through much of story by the need to rescue his sister, Cee. It isn't an easy trip, so perseverance and courage could also be important themes to discuss. Sex and sexuality are explored at various points in the novel, and readers see a very warped view of both through Dr. Beauregard.

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What is the main theme of Home?

The main theme of this powerful text is identified in the epigraph that begins the story. This is actually a quote from a song cycle written by the author prior to writing the book, but it clearly identifies the theme that governs this text: that of home and the difficulty of pinning down precisely what "home" is and where it may be:

Whose house is this? Whose night keeps out the light In here? Say, who owns this house? It’s not mine. I dreamed another, sweeter, brighter with a view of lakes crossed in painted boats; Of fields wide as arms open for me. This house is strange. Its shadows lie. Say, tell me, why does its lock fit my key?

Through the central character Frank Money and his return to the States after his involvement in the Korean war, Morrison turns her attention to the concept of home and the difficulties there can be in trying to locate and define thie term. The quote identifies the feeling that Frank himself experiences when he returns to his home town, that "home" is not any more "home," because of the strangeness that he experiences and feels as he returns there. Note the personification of the shadows in the quote as actively deceiving the speaker. This is of course the experience of Frank as he tries to make a life for himself after his involvement in the war and struggles against losing his mind and the other various difficulties he encounters. What the central theme of this novel is therefore is the problematic meaning of home and its impact on our lives.

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What are some themes in the book "Home"?

The general theme in Toni Morrison's novel Home is a combat soldier's difficulty adjusting after returning home from war. Morrison's narrative is explicit in describing the dehumanized state of Korean people, as witnessed by the novel's protagonist, Frank Money.

After witnessing such horrors, the expectation is that, once he returns home to the country that he served, he will be welcomed and comforted. However, because Frank is a black veteran, he is not met with warmth and gratitude.

His sense of "home" has always been tenuous. He is the son of sharecroppers who were forced out of Frank's first home by white supremacists, "both hooded and not." The choice was: leave Bandera County, Texas within twenty-four hours, or die. Thus, another important theme of the novel is how difficult it is for black people, particularly within the context of the virulently racist 1950s, to find a place to call home.

Frank's ravaged state of mind—the result of an inability to cope with trauma—could be a metaphor for a collective sense of being haunted by past torments. It could also refer to an inability to find ease or comfort within one's homeland—a place no less hostile than a war zone for black people.

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