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In addition to all the ways in which Bilbo shows heroism through action, there are also a number of more subtle ways in which he demonstrates heroic qualities. He starts the tale as a mild-mannered hobbit, afraid of the thought of moving beyond his front yard, let alone going far away on an adventure. For the early part of the campaign, he is very much a liability to Thorin and company, but by the time the party reaches the Misty Mountains, Bilbo is already beginning to establish himself as capable and, even at times, semi-confident.

He defeats Gollum in a game of riddles, often thinking two or three steps ahead in the game. At one point he gives Gollum an easy riddle in order to buy himself a little more time to think of a tricky one. This suggests he is so confident that he will get Gollum's next riddle that he is turning the battle of wits into a chess match. Further, when he meets back up with the dwarves and saves them from the spiders, he ends up taking control of the party, giving orders so that they are able to escape. This arc continues through his rescue of the dwarves when, as they complain about having to ride down the river in the barrels he has used to smuggle them out, he tells them that they are more than welcome to get back in the barrels and go back to prison if they would like to.

Bilbo continues to display heroism through the very end of the tale, when Thorin realizes his own foolishness and begins to understand the heroic qualities that Bilbo exhibits when Bilbo turns over the Arkenstone and tried to diffuse the tension before war erupts. As a hero, Bilbo knows when to take a stand and fight but also when to stand down and compromise.

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Bilbo is a hero in multiple ways in The Hobbit. He shows his heroism most in Mirkwood and the Lonely Mountain. First, Bilbo rescues his friends from the spiders in the forest. When his friends stray from the path to ask the Wood-elves for help, they are captured by the giant spiders. Bilbo puts on the One Ring, making him invisible, and then goes after his friends, freeing them from their web prisons and killing a lot of the spiders with his sword, which is when his sword gets its name, Sting. After being rescued from the spiders, the dwarves are then captured by the Elves, and Bilbo follows after them, still invisible. He then rescues his friends from the Wood-elves' prison.

Later, he finds the hidden path leading up the mountain toward the secret entrance of the Lonely Mountain. After realizing how to get into the mountain, he is sent to face Smaug, where he saw a bare spot on Smaug's belly - the one vulnerable spot on the dragon's entire body - which helped Bard the Bowman kill the dragon a little later. He also sacrificed his own share of the treasure when he took the Arkenstone and sneaked down to give it to Bard and Thranduil in an effort to end the war.

In the end, Bilbo shows many qualities of a hero: bravery, intelligence, sacrifice, etc. Without him, the quest for Erebor would have failed entirely.

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Is Bilbo a hero?

I would consider Bilbo a hero, just for the fact that he steps way beyond his comfort zone and goes on a large-scale adventure.  He puts himself at risk on several occasions to look after the welfare of others, and Bilbo is doggedly persistent, not giving up--even when the going gets tough!

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Is Bilbo a hero?

In the archetypal sense, Bilbo is a hero.  He embarks on the Hero’s Journey and does go through all of the phases.  In many cases, the archetypal hero is not what we would consider heroic, at least to begin with.  The hero often gets pushed along on his adventure, as Gandalf does for Bilbo.  Few archetypal heroes actually go searching for the adventure or journey.  The journey is a difficult and painful process, full of danger and mistakes.  Bilbo makes plenty of mistakes, but in the end he does change and mature.  In essence, the archetypal hero is willing to put his mission above himself.  This hero is able to sacrifice his comfort (no small feat for Bilbo) and even his life to save others.

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Is Bilbo a hero?

I think this novel is actually about the formation of Bilbo Baggins from comfort-loving Hobbit into a fully fledged hero at the end of the novel. Thus he doesn't start off as a hero but certainly as his character develops by the incidents that he faces he shows himself to be truly heroic, especially in contrast to other "heroic" characters. Just consider, for example, how Bilbo shows himself superior to Thorin by rejecting greed and gladly giving up his share of the treasure to deliver the Arkenstone to Bard.

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Is Bilbo a hero?

A hero also embodies a set of values to be upheld. Bilbo is timid and is a follower, but is also humble and true to his firends, and tries always to do the right thing - even when it might be unpleasant (like handing over the Arkenstone). He also embodies a good story arc: he is less timid by the end of the story, because he actually tries to be bolder. We see this when he confronts Smaug as well as the spiders in Mirkwood. And he uses his head instead of more athletic aspects of heroism, as when he rescues his friends from the Elves. So yes, I'd still call him a hero not because he is larger than life (excuse the pun), but because he is as small as we all often are, and still tries to do what is right.

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In The Hobbit, was bilbo an anti-hero or hero?

Bilbo is most definitely a hero in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit. Throughout the story, he changes from a very basic, home-loving, somewhat timid hobbit to a great adventurer, brave fighter, and even a master tactician. Initially, he is out of his element. He is at the mercy of cave trolls, he gets lost in the dark, and he often finds himself wishing to be back home. However, as the story progresses, he begins to not only rely on himself more and more, but the other members of the company begin to rely on him as well. Where at first Gandalf is forced to save the entire party, as the story progresses Gandalf moves more into the background and Bilbo steps forth as both savior and leader. He gains control of his wits and intellect and begins to develop his own strategies to not only survive, but also succeed. Further, unlike the typical anti-hero, Bilbo does not display any characteristics that make him unlikable. He is kind, respectful, and cheery from the very start of the story. Anti-heroes tend to be lawbreakers, or have some type of sordid past that they are hiding or running from. The closest Bilbo comes to having negative characteristics is his initial home-loving, semi-soft nature. However, those are far from negative strikes against his character, and he soon begins to work through them regardless. Even though he realizes at the end of the story that he prefers his comfortable existence, within him lies a great hero.

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In The Hobbit, was bilbo an anti-hero or hero?

Bilbo should be classified as a hero in The Hobbit, albeit a very unlikely one.  He begins his quest with the dwarves with very little skill or strength of arms to recommend him; however as the novel develops, the reader sees Bilbo adapt to extremely difficult situations and environments, while using his wits to survive and even overcome almost impossible obstacles.  His true turning point to full 'hero status' really arrives in the forests of Mirkwood when he not only vanquishes the spiders with his sword Sting, but also rescues the rest of the dwarves from the webs, and then later goes on to free them from the dungeons of the Elven King.  Bilbo should be considered a hero in The Hobbit, because he truly does rise to the challenges of the quest and ultimately provides valuable aid to the dwarves, helping rescue them on multiple occasions. 

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Is Bilbo an unlikely hero?

Yes, Bilbo did not expect to be a hero.  However, he did have what it takes to be a hero.  He turned out to be brave, and intelligent.  His services were vital to the mission's success.  The biggest mistake he made was taking the ring and keeping it secret.

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Is Bilbo an unlikely hero?

Bilbo is an unlikely hero in this story.  We are told that Hobbits are quiet, reserved people who don't go away from home.  Bilbo sets out with a group of dwarfs because they need his help.  He is repeatedly draw into conflicts along side this group and shows himself to be quite capable despite the fact that he has never been away from home before.  As the story progresses, we see Bilbo move from the accidental hero to something far more intentional.  Many times he could have run away and saved himself at the expense of his companions, but he does not.  Bilbo does what he believes is right whether others agree with him or not.  In the end, it is because of Bilbo that the missions succeeds.  Bilbo becomes the hero even though he is the one least likely to hold such a position at the start of their journey.

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