Henry Gregor Felsen Alice M. Jordan - Essay

Alice M. Jordan

(Contemporary Literary Criticism)

[Struggle is Our Brother is a] tense exciting story. This is war in its stark reality, no trace of the glamour that used to surround stories of battles…. Sincerity and lifelike characters make this a very real picture of the Cossacks, who have called out the admiration of the world. It is a gripping story, demonstrating the meaning of love of country.

Alice M. Jordan, "The Booklist: 'Struggle Is Our Brother'," in The Horn Book Magazine (copyrighted, 1943, by The Horn Book, Inc., Boston), Vol. XIX, No. 2, March, 1943, p. 104.

Three or four movies could be made, and probably have been, from the material in [Submarine Sailor], in which, on an eleven-week operational cruise, practically everything that can happen to a submarine in the Pacific does happen, along with a few things the reader might be excused for supposing improbable. The strenuous events, however, merely provide scope for demonstrating the capabilities of an American submarine when she struts her stuff, a display that Navy-minded boys will appreciate.

"Books: 'Submarine Sailor'," in The New Yorker (© 1943 by The New Yorker Magazine, Inc.), Vol. XIX, No. 42, December 4, 1943, p. 135.

[Some Follow the Sea is a] might-be-true story of Chris who joined the merchant marine, when he was turned down by the Navy, and of his adventures crossing, first to Scotland, then to Murmansk, then back to England—each time with a torpedoing en route. The distinguishing thing about this book is that Chris isn't all hero…. A most unglorified picture of life on a merchant ship, written by someone who knows where of he writes.

"Fiction: 'Some Follow the Sea'," in Virginia Kirkus' Bookshop Service, Vol. XII, No. 4, February 15, 1944, p. 97.