In "The Guide," was Rosie responsible for all the misfortunes that befell Raju?

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The idea that Rosie is responsible for Raju's misfortunes seems to be deeply rooted in prejudice. Raju and Rosie are like everybody else, flawed and imperfect. Rosie seeks solace and emotional support in Raju's company. The charismatic tour guide can gauge the emotional needs of another person, a trait that he often uses to his advantage. Initially, he gives Rosie "a new lease of life," but later, he becomes dependent on her, emotionally and financially. While Rosie discovers her potential for self-reliance, Raju, caught in the coils of greed and deception, is charged and convicted for forgery. This turn of events in the story highlights the fascinating complexity of human relationships.

An analysis of Raju's tumultuous life reveals that it is the essential nature of the individual and his life choices that ultimately determine his fate.

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I would say that while Rosie has a role in what happens to Raju, his own actions play a significant part in his own condition.  His desire to encourage Rosie to become a dancer, to manage her career, and to become enveloped in the trappings of the wealth she generated are all actions for which he has to bear a great deal of responsibility.  This is only enhanced by his engaging in activities which, while not immediately motivated by criminal interest, were done in a duplicitous manner to sustain their relationship and his profitable connection to her.  Raju's desire to be with Rosie and to, in a sense, control her is a shift in advocacy from how he was at the start of their relationship, where her husband's disapproval of her dancing helped to prevent her from achieving her full sense of self.  Raju has to bear some level of responsibility for embodying in his own right what he initially protested against.

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