What does Gatsby mean when he says Daisy's voice is "full of money"?

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When Gatsby says Daisy's voice is "full of money," he means that one can sense her wealth and privilege just from hearing her speak. The beautiful Daisy has always lived a life of luxury, facing no consequences for her words or actions. Daisy's manner of speaking (which Nick calls "indiscreet") reflects her privileged position in society.

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In chapter seven, Daisy Buchanan openly flirts with Jay Gatsby in front of her husband and Nick Carraway remarks that she has an "indiscreet voice." Nick means that Daisy lacks restraint and is willing to say anything she desires because she is self-assured, unabashed, and confident. However, Gatsby responds to Nick's observation by saying, "Her voice is full of money." Gatsby recognizes that Daisy speaks from a position of privilege, authority, and financial security, which is directly associated with her affluent upbringing and elevated social status. Daisy's words carry an entitled air, which is unrestrained, charming, and conceited. Gatsby does not resent this about Daisy but understands that she feels free to express herself at all times precisely because her wealth and status protect her.

Unlike Gatsby, Daisy hails from an affluent family and has enjoyed living in luxury her entire life. She has never had to work for anything and is portrayed as a materialistic and selfish woman. Daisy's entitled, privileged attitude is reflected in her voice, which "jingles" like the sound of money. Nick understands exactly what Gatsby means by this observation, extending it further by comparing Daisy's voice to that of a "king's daughter" or "golden girl."

Ultimately, Daisy's charming, dignified voice corresponds to her self-centered personality. Her privilege allows her to dismiss others' feelings and avoid the consequences of her actions. Daisy not only carries on an affair with Gatsby and plays with his emotions but also allows him to take the blame for Myrtle's death (which Daisy herself caused). Gatsby's comment that Daisy's voice is "full of money" is his way of recognizing her privileged, entitled attitude—though it doesn't make her less appealing to him.

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In answering this question, it's important to bear in mind that Gatsby's observation comes just after Nick's remark that Daisy has an indiscreet voice. Gatsby's remark that Daisy's voice is “full of money” is a clear indication that her penchant for making indiscreet remarks is indissolubly linked to her wealth and high social status.

Because Daisy is rich and privileged, she feels unconstrained in what she says. This attitude is mirrored by her actions, which more often than not show a total disregard for other people. The most obvious example of this, of course, would be Daisy's failing to take responsibility for the death of Myrtle Wilson, even though she was behind the wheel of the car that mowed Myrtle down.

Daisy believes herself a class apart, unconstrained by what she regards as the petty rules and standards that apply to those less privileged than herself. And it is somewhat inevitable that everything about her should in some way reflect this entitled attitude. That includes the sound of her voice, which has a distinct jingle of money about it.

To Nick, this may be a source of “inexhaustible charm,” but most of us are likely to conclude that there's also something dangerous about it, something that reveals a certain contempt for basic moral norms and values.

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Daisy's voice conveys her security and privilege. She is not used to ever having to speak discreetly because, for her whole life, everyone has always wanted to hear what the wealthy Miss Daisy Fay or Mrs. Daisy Buchanan had to say. She has been raised with money as a member of society's elite, and she has always been an object of interest and admiration to those around her. Her manners are everything that society says is desirable; her clothing, her hair, her speech, everything about her has been held up by society as the ideal.

Daisy has never learned to be discreet, has probably never learned to consider the consequences of her words or actions on the people around her, has likely never had much to say that would not have been of interest to others. She has nearly every kind of privilege that a person can have in her society—except that she is a woman and not a man—and this sense of security and privilege seems infuse her very voice, just as it shapes her behavior. This is a woman who hits and kills another person with a car and yet seems to feel absolutely no remorse or concern for that person at all. Thus, when Gatsby says she has a voice "full of money," it seems as if Gatsby can hear Daisy's privilege in her voice.

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It is Nick who first comments on Daisy's voice and what he says is 'she's got an indiscreet voice'. Money and indiscretion are both present in her voice and are therefore linked. Her indiscretion is a factor of her money. Nick himself is thought to be careful by Jordan, so it is not something he is likely to approve of.

By the end Daisy and Tom and by extension rich people like them are seen by Nick as not just indiscreet but irresponsible, their wealth literally allowing them to get away with murder, to escape any responsibility for Gatsby's death. Nick comments 'They were careless people, Tom and Daisy - they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness'. Here money and carelessness are synonymous and Nick is sickened by the sort of behaviour that wealth allows; Daisy and her voice was an earlier image of this.

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In this passage from Chapter 7, Nick is trying to pinpoint what is so elusive about the quality of Daisy's voice.  Gatsby notes that her voice is "full of money," meaning she has the tonal quality of never knowing want, of having always been well provided for, of being elitely educated.  These facts are unconsciously conveyed by the lilt of her voice and the inflections of her vowels and consonants.  Gatsby and Nick, on the other hand, are from a working class backgrounds.   Nick still struggles,  but Gatsby has succeeded monetarily.  Still, he has not the history of wealth that backs Daisy's sense of security.  His speech is practiced and measured rather than effortless and secure. 

Gatsby knows the sounds of old money when he hears it. 

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Certainly, I think the interpretation of this line as meaning that Daisy's voice is indiscreet has a great deal of merit. When Gatsby says that her voice is full of money, Nick says,

That was it. I'd never understood before. It was full of money—that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it. . . . High in a white palace the king's daughter, the golden girl. . . .

Daisy's voice seems to be full of qualities associated with having lots of money. She makes no effort to modulate her tone, because she's really never had to be concerned about people not wanting to hear her. She has a certain sense of entitlement because she's been brought up to believe that she is important, and she speaks like it. Further, as someone who's never had to worry about where her next meal is coming from, or how to pay the gas bill, for example, the kinds of concerns she's had have been much less significant than those of the lower classes. She's been relatively untouchable, not subject to the everyday and commonplace cares that most people have, because she's always had money. The "charm" of her voice, the "song of it," seems to convey this.

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Before the party leaves Tom's estate and heads into the city, Daisy calls from an upper window to ask if they should bring anything to drink with them, and Gatsby comments to Nick that he cannot say anything in Tom's home. When Nick mentions that Daisy has an indiscreet voice, Gatsby says, "Her voice is full of money" (Fitzgerald, 128). Gatsby is essentially indicating that money and wealth are inherently a part of Daisy's character and a major influence in her life, and this is revealed in her tone of voice. Daisy hails from an affluent family and married Tom Buchanan because of his immense wealth. Her primary goal in life is to maintain her upper-class social status, which is something Gatsby notices in her voice. According to Gatsby, the sound of Daisy's voice reveals her superficial, materialistic personality, and he can tell she is only focused on money. Overall, Gatsby is acknowledging that Daisy's tone of voice is elitist and emphasizes her desire for money and a luxurious life.

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In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby says that Daisy's voice is full of money. What does he mean, and how does it suggest her importance to him?

Daisy's voice casts a powerful spell on men, and when Nick struggles to describe it, Gatsby cuts to the chase, saying it is "full of money." Nick agrees, believing that Gatsby has gotten to the heart of its allure.

Gatsby means that Daisy's throaty voice has the self-assurance of a person who never has had to do without anything material. She has always had status, a fine home, good clothes, and stable parents. She has never had to feel ashamed or reinvent herself, because she was born to affluence. This gives her an innate self-confidence that is reflected in how she speaks, knowing that that she will be heard and admired.

This is especially compelling to Gatsby, who grew up without material goods and ashamed of his background. Money has an oversized importance to him because no matter how rich he becomes, he can never feel assured of it the way Daisy is of her own wealth. He constantly has to prove his worth, which is why he feels compelled to show off his nouveau riche mansion to her and fling in front of her shirt after shirt. It is as if he is constantly seeking approval and the reassurance that he has what he thinks he has. This suggests that his attraction to Daisy is as much or more about the secure affluence that she symbolizes than Daisy herself.

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In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby says that Daisy's voice is full of money. What does he mean, and how does it suggest her importance to him?

In chapter seven of The Great Gatsby, Gatsby says that Daisy’s voice is "full of money." His description reflects his aspiration to assimilate into "old money" society and prove himself worthy of Daisy.

Despite his wealth, Gatsby feels like an outsider; he is “new money” and does not feel like he belongs to the same world as Tom and Daisy. In fact, just earlier in scene, Gatsby stiffly told Nick, "I can't say anything in his house, old sport." He feels impotent and voiceless in Tom and Daisy’s environment. Their house represents an institution of money to which Daisy belongs. It is a “white palace” in which she is a princess, a perfect, rich golden girl.

Gatsby’s description emphasizes a physical representation of money from which Daisy came. Nick realizes that indeed, her voice even sounds like coin, noting “the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it.” Instead of singing an actual song, her voice resembles clinking cash. Also, Daisy’s manner of speaking as well as speech pattern reveal her social class. Nick notes that her voice had an “inexhaustible charm that rose and fell”; this characterization reflects a cultured, and perhaps pampered and manipulative, nature that can develop as a result of a privileged, moneyed upbringing.

Interestingly, earlier in the chapter, Daisy had revealed her feelings for Gatsby in front of Tom. After whining about the heat, she looked at Gatsby and repeatedly told him that he looked cool. When Tom noticed Daisy and Gatsby gazing at each other, she forced herself to look away and tried to cover up the awkward situation by changing the subject.

She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. "You resemble the advertisement of the man," she went on innocently. "You know the advertisement of the man—"

The fact that Daisy compared Gatsby to a man in an advertisement further emphasizes her connection to commerce and glamor.

Nick criticized Daisy to Gatsby after her faux pas and said, "She's got an indiscreet voice." Gatsby, however, is unable to see Daisy in a negative light; all he can declare is "Her voice is full of money."

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In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby says that Daisy's voice is full of money. What does he mean, and how does it suggest her importance to him?

When Gatsby says that Daisy's voice is full of money, he says it so assuredly and means that Daisy belongs in East Egg where the people have never known anything else.  Allow me to further extrapolate.  Let's begin by looking at the entire text:

"She's got an indiscreet voice," I remarked.  "It's full of--" I hesitated.

"Her voice is full of money," he said suddenly.

That was it.  I'd never understood it before.  It was full of money--that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it. . . . High in a white palace the king's daughter, the golden girl. . . . (Fitzgerald 120)

This passage, especially Nick's inner monologue description of it, echoes his very first description of East Egg at the very beginning of the book where he describes the "white palaces of fashionable East Egg" glittering along the bay (5).  East Egg, of course, is the land of "old money," meaning that these are people who don't work and have never needed to work.  They have grown up with money, . . . and often their great-great-grandfathers had grown up with money as well.  The money is "old" because it has been passed down from generation to generation with no worry about it running out.  This way of life is incredibly attractive to Gatsby because it something he has never had.  Because it is something one is born with, it is something is something that Gatsby never will have, either.  The best he can hope for is the "less fashionable" West Egg:  the home of "new money," or money that had to be earned.  Ah, but this is what makes Daisy so attractive and yet so unattainable.  Daisy, in addition to a lover's obsession, also proves to be a monetary obsession as well.  In my opinion, Daisy would be the ultimate prize to someone like Gatsby:  the acquisition of his love and the only way to achieve the inherited wealth of East Egg.

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According to Nick, what does Gatsby mean when he says that Daisy's "voice is full of money"?

In reply to Nick's comment that Daisy has "an indiscreet voice" that is "full of --," Gatsby replies that "Her voice is full of money." By "indiscreet voice," Nick is referring to the fact that Daisy has spent all afternoon flirting with Gatsby and even telling him she loves him directly in front of her husband. Nick means that she lacks self-restraint and even wisdom. However, Gatsby's comment that "her mouth is full of money" refers to Daisy's wealthy upbringing and demeanor. As Nick further realizes, Daisy's voice sounds like the voice of a "king's daughter." She sounds self-assured and like she can obtain anything she desires. According to Nick, her voice even "jingles" and clinks like money. Gatsby is pointing out that it is Daisy's wealth that has allowed and driven her to behave the way she has, such as shamelessly and indiscreetly flirting with Gatsby in front of her husband, and Nick agrees.

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According to Nick, what does Gatsby mean when he says that Daisy's "voice is full of money"?

At one point in the novel, Jay Gatsby romantically describes Daisy as "the grail," alluding to the holy grail, the unattainable goal of the chivalric knights.  In his quest for Daisy, whose name suggests purity, and in his romantic delusions, Gatsby perceives Daisy as the ultimate goal in his materialistic world.  However, by saying that her "voice is full of money," Gatsby suggests that she is also like a material object, namely money, that can be attained.

Interestingly, this figure of speech that Gatsby employs is ironic.  For one thing,  Gatsby suggests that Daisy's speech is the language of the wealthy, when in reality she speaks of petty things, even foolishness.  For another thing, it is not Daisy's voice at all that attracts Gatsby; it is the status of having a woman from the wealthy class that he desires.  Rather than being prized for her voice and what she says, Daisy is merely a status symbol. 

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In The Great Gatsby, why does Gatsby say Daisy's voice is full of money?

Gatsby's characterization of Daisy's voice can probably best be read as an accurate metaphor or as a way to symbolize the meaning of Daisy's character. She is objectified here as a symbol of wealth for Gatsby but she is also a fully developed representative of the habits and mores of the wealthy elite when seen in the larger context of the novel.

The metaphor describes a truth about Daisy's character both for Gatsby as a striving, ambitious and romantic figure and for the narrative as a whole wherein Daisy is used to represent certain qualities and perspectives. 

Notably, when Gatsby proclaims that Daisy's voice is full of money, Nick seems to think that Gatsby has found the perfect description.

“Her voice is full of money,” [Gatsby] said suddenly.

That was it.… That was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbal’s song of it.…

If Nick agrees (as the narrator of the tale) and corroborates Gatsby's assessment of Daisy's most prominent and alluring trait, we can take the idea that her voice is full of money as a truth about Daisy.

In a novel where appearances prove often to be false, we have to look hard to find moments where the truth burns through the facade. For Daisy, this happens when she encounters the beautiful shirts in Gatsby's house and sobs over them. She is depicted as a person who seeks to gratify her desires, eschewing marital and/or parental obligations, willing to play at an affair with a wealthy man from her past, but unwilling to take responsibility for the consequences of her actions. 

Daisy is, in short, a person of great entitlement. We see the ways that money can insulate people from personal obligations and even from legal responsibility but we see more principally the idea that money allows adults to lead a life of play. This idea is connected to notions of glamour and pretense. Ultimately the notion that wealth corrupts comes to be associated very closely with the idea that these rich figures are not compelled to honestly be themselves and instead take on roles that suit them in the moment. 

Given this point of view as to the significance of wealth in The Great Gatsby, Gatsby's claim that Daisy's is thoroughly connected with money even down to her speaking voice serves to situation Daisy within the narrative. She plays a role with Gatsby then plays a different one after running down Myrtle in the street. Daisy is free -- or feels free -- to continue to play a part, to be dishonest, to be removed from responsibility because she is wealthy. 

Daisy exhibits all of the un-reflective moral corruption of her ilk. 

Of perhaps equal importance is the idea that Gatsby seeks to attain Daisy. She is, for him, a symbol of wealth. Thus, Daisy's symbolism is doubled in the sense that she represents the moral shallowness of the wealthy elite and stands as the defining object of wealth for Gatsby. 

If the novel suggests that the rich elite are capable of treating other people as objects and ignore the subjective humanity of others, it is fitting that they are also given an objectified symbol in Daisy. 

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What are the implications of Gatsby's observation that Daisy's voice is full of money?

In chapter seven, Jay Gatsby observes that Daisy's voice is full of money, which implies that she is more concerned about wealth than finding genuine happiness or cultivating a meaningful relationship. Gatsby's quote implies that Daisy Buchanan's primary concern is her financial security and social status.

Unlike Gatsby, who has recently amassed his wealth and lives in West Egg, Daisy comes from old money and is a member of the East Egg social elite. The fact that her voice is full of money not only implies her superficial nature but also alludes to the fact that Gatsby will never be accepted into her social class. As a resident of East Egg, Daisy is above Gatsby's social class and out of his reach. When Gatsby notices that her voice is full of money, his observation implies the impossibility of his endeavor.

Despite the fact that Daisy is more interested in financial security and social status than she is concerned about falling in love, Gatsby is undeterred and continues to pursue her without accepting the reality of the situation. Overall, Gatsby's comment about Daisy's voice implies that he will never win her heart and that her primary concern is maintaining her wealth and social status as an elite East Egg resident.

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What are the implications of Gatsby's observation that Daisy's voice is full of money?

The quotation tells us an awful lot about Daisy's character. Her voice is "full of money" in the sense that she shares the accent and vocal mannerisms of the old money elite. Every time she opens her mouth you can tell straight away where she's from and what her social status is.

The problem for Gatsby is that this simply demonstrates to him just how unattainable she is. Daisy's very much old money; always has been, always will be. Though Gatsby may be fantastically wealthy, he has no established name; he's a West Egger through and through. Daisy, and the other members of the East Egg social elite, may condescend to come to his lavish parties, but they still look down on him as a nouveau riche upstart, a parvenu who wants to buy his way into high society. Gatsby may have the money, but his voice doesn't and so he'll always remain an outsider to the likes of Daisy Buchanan.

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What does the phrase "her voice full of money," referring to Daisy in The Great Gatsby, symbolise?

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Every word Daisy says reflects the wealth with which she surrounds herself. Gatsby recognizes this fact and makes the comment when Nick is trying to excuse Daisy's insensitive comments.

Gatsby may have been remembering when he first met Daisy, visiting her parents' mansion in Louisville when she was a teenager and he was a young officer in training before being shipped overseas.

Gatsby may have been recognizing the vast but superficial social world that Daisy loved. Her goal in life was to be surrounded by beautiful people sharing beautiful experiences, without being concerned about developing any depth to any of the relationships.

as we strolled out among the sparkling hundreds, Daisy's voice was playing murmurous tricks in her throat. "These things excite me so," she whispered.

Nick immediately understands and agrees with Gatsby's analysis.

It was full of money-that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it...High in a white palace the king's daughter, the golden girl...

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In The Great Gatsby, examine the significance of the idea that Daisy's voice is "full of money."

When Gatsby says that Daisy's voice is full of money, it explains why he has been able to believe that his pursuit of her will be successful.  Nick does not identify it initially, but Gatsby does.  This causes Nick to reflect on the meaning and significance of Daisy's voice being filled with money:

That was it. I’d never understood before. It was full of money — that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it. . . . high in a white palace the king’s daughter, the golden girl. . . .

This insight is significant for a couple of reasons. Daisy's voice being full of money reflects her true nature.  While Daisy seems trapped or uncertain of what to do or who to become, Gatsby reduces her to her most basic element.  Gatsby recognizes who Daisy is.  He understands that her love of money, the fact that her voice is "full of it," is how he is able to win her over.  He believes that this is the critical element which can allow him to have her as his own.  However, it is also this understanding that makes clear her choices will never end up supporting Gatsby.  Daisy will always side with money in the form of  established wealth.  It is for this reason that she will never leave Tom.  When Nick describes Gatsby "watching over nothing" at the end of the narrative, it speaks to how empty a pursuit of someone who is only "full of money" really is.  Gatsby's statement of how Daisy's voice is full of money and how her entire being can be reduced to money makes his pursuit of her hollow.  The one instance of his honest insight is a reflection on the emptiness of his pursuit.  Daisy will never leave the established wealth of Tom because her entire being is "full of money," something that Gatsby both understands and simultaneously ignores, believing that she will leave her husband.  It is a statement that reveals Gatsby to be profoundly insightful and equally pathetic.

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In simple terms, what does Gatsby mean when he says that Daisy's voice is "full of money"?

Jay says this in chapter 7 as he, Nick, Jordan, Daisy, and Tom are preparing to drive into the city the day that Daisy, later, hits and kills Myrtle.  From his early days, as shown by the inscription in the old book of Jay's that Jay's father shows to Nick after Jay is killed, Jay Gatsby (James Gatz at that time) wanted to move up in life.  He was determined to make life for himself that was easier than the one his parents had.  Dan Cody cemented that desire when he showed Jay how to live the sumptuous life.  When the group is in New York and the tensions have built to a peak, in the angry confrontation between Jay and Tom, Jay tells Tom that Daisy only married Tom because Jay was poor and Daisy was tired of waiting for him.  It always comes back to money or the lack of it.  To Jay Gatsby, Daisy is his "golden girl"; she is the absolutely perfect woman.  She is young, beautiful, vivacious, and very importantly, she is rich.  When Jay says that Daisy's voice is full of money, he means that she is this perfect woman and that even her voice reflects what is perfect about her.  As Nick explained in his narration following the comment, Daisy's voice reflects the rhythm of wealth and privilege- all that Jay desired.

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What does Gatsby mean when he says that Daisy's voice is full of money? Does he mean it negatively?

The protagonist of of The Great Gatsby is Jay Gatsby, a wealthy man who is quite taken with Daisy, a debutante originally from a very wealthy family in Kentucky. We also learn that Jay is a former love of Daisy’s.

Describing Daisy’s voice as full of money does a couple of things. First, Jay views Daisy, like money, as an object he is obsessed with possessing. He has spent his life amassing a wealth he thinks would win her over. Secondly, Daisy is a lady of leisure who has never worked a day in her life or known any real hardship, such as hunger or homelessness. She is petty, privileged, spoiled, and gossipy.

I don’t think he necessarily means it negatively. One could argue that he knows she is shallow and materialistic, as is he. Here, he seems to be making an observation. If anything, it could speak to his attraction to her more. Gatsby is obsessed with two things: acquiring the kind of status and wealth that might win Daisy back, and Daisy herself.

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How does Daisy's voice being "full of money" affect Daisy and Gatsby's relationship?

What is most notable about this comment that Jay Gatsby makes to Nick is that before, Gatsby rarely spoke about Daisy’s wealth. Although he told Nick about growing up poor and his difficult ascent into the world of the wealthy, and although Gatsby spends a lot of money, he does not really talk about it.

Gatsby needs to cling to the idea that his relationship with Daisy depends on their deep, true love for one another. The first time he is a guest in Daisy and Tom’s home, she makes it apparent that she loves Gatsby, and Tom notices immediately. Jay makes this comment after Daisy calls down from an upper-story window, and Nick cannot quite describe how her voice sounds. He immediately realizes that Jay is right. His description of her princess–like status accentuates the difference between Jay and Daisy and foreshadows the end that will soon come. Later that afternoon, she refuses to say that she never loved Tom.

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