Why do people in Jonas's community in The Giver take pills for the Stirrings?

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As was mentioned in the previous post, Jonas explains his odd dream to his parents in Chapter 5. Jonas tells his parents that in his dream, he was in the bathing room at the House of the Old with Fiona and he became angry when she refused to get into the bathtub with him. Jonas has a hard time understanding why he felt angry when Fiona did not take him seriously during the dream and admits to his father that he had strong feelings of "wanting." After Jonas' father leaves with Lily, his mother explains to him that he is beginning to experience "Stirrings." She tells Jonas that it is perfectly natural to have Stirrings and Jonas remembers when the Speaker said, "ATTENTION. A REMINDER THAT STIRRINGS MUST BE REPORTED IN ORDER FOR TREATMENT TO TAKE PLACE." Jonas' mother then gives Jonas a pill which happens to be the same pill that she and her husband take each morning. The pills suppress sexual desires and censor the citizens' emotions. Jonas' society values conformity, equality, censorship, and compliance. Natural sexual emotions threaten to undermine the society's social structure, particularly the Matching of Spouses.

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In Chapter Five of The Giver, the family discusses their dreams; normally, Jonas has none to tell about, but this day he relates a dream he has had in which he is at the House of the Old in the bathing room. In his dream, there is a tub and Jonas tries to convince Fiona to get into the tub.

...."She was laughing. But I wasn't. I was almost a little angry at her, in the dream, because she wasn't taking me seriously.....I was almost a little angry at her, in the dream, because she wasn't taking me seriously."

Further, Jonas tells his parents his strongest feeling; however, not understanding why his Mother responds that he must take a pill. Jonas does recalls that in the Book of Rules there is a reference to them. And, then, Jonas recalss that a voice over the loudspeaker saying that stirrings must be reported so that treatment can begin.  His mother tells Jonas that he must begin taking the pills for the Stirrings just as she and his father do. But, vaguely Jonas remembers that he enjoyed and the stirrings and wanted to feel the Stirrings again.

Of course, the "Stirrings" are sexual feelings that the Community wishes to control so that there is no trouble such as fighting among the males or jealousy among the girls. The society in which Jonas lives censors the thoughts and feelings of its inhabitants.

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Why does Jonas take pills in The Giver?

In chapter 5, Jonas tells his parents about his sexually charged dream with Fiona at the House of the Old. Jonas explains to his parents that in his dream he wished that Fiona would disrobe and bathe with him in a tub. He also describes the "wanting" he felt as he stood face to face with Fiona wishing she would get into the tub with him. Jonas's parents immediately recognize his feelings and inform him that he is simply experiencing the "Stirrings," which are his inherent sexual desires. Jonas's mother proceeds to tell him that the Stirrings are typical, and all he needs to do is take a pill each day to quell the Stirrings. In Jonas's highly organized, structured society, citizens are required to take pills to suppress their natural sexual desires. In a society where citizens' partners are chosen by the Committee of Elders, suppressing citizens' sexual desires is an important aspect of maintaining a stable, predictable community.

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Why does Jonas take pills in The Giver?

Aside from pain pills, which do not seem to be used very much, the pills that Jonas takes are for his "Stirrings."  He begins these shortly before he is expected to celebrate his Ceremony of Twelve, which means he is about to turn twelve years old.  The pills begin after he reports a dream to his parents in which he wanted his friend Fiona to take off all of her clothes and get in the bathtub, so he could touch her and bathe her. These were Jonas' first indication of sexual desire, which is what Stirrings are called in the community.  Sexual desire is a condition that the community "treats" with these pills because the community wants all sexual desire to be repressed. Both of Jonas' parents take these pills, as does his friend Asher. Babies are produced by Birthmothers, and there is no other reproduction in the community. Each family unit gets two children this way.  It is clear that the community does not want people to have sex.  This is a means of controlling the population. If people do not have sex, there is no risk of unwanted pregnancies. I also think that repressing sexuality is meant to avoid all the messy emotions that result from sexual desire, love and jealousy, for example. 

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