In The Giver, what is the main character's problem and its solution?

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Jonas, the main character in The Giver, actually faces a few problems in the book. That being said, the primary problem he encounters, and then actually runs from, is that the elders of the community he lives in have made collective decisions to keep information from the majority of the citizens. The information they keep from them is information that we, in our own society now, consider to be integral to a healthy way of living, not just for individuals, but also for communities as a whole. In his new position as receiver, Jonas must learn information that the community is not allowed to have, and the emotional weight and burden of this knowledge becomes more than he can stand. He realizes he no longer wants to be part of a community run in this way and his solution is to leave.

One piece of information that the elders have decided to keep from everyone is how death occurs. It is a very sanitized and secretive process in the book, so much so that very few people know what happens at the end of life. The community calls this "release" and a small celebration of life is given, but then the person simply leaves the community. Doctors, and elders, know what "release" really is, but the majority of citizens are unaware of the process of death. This one example is just one piece of information that is keep from the average person.

So, the problem Jonas faces is that he becomes aware of information that the majority of his community does not have and never will be allowed to have. The information is also very burdensome for Jonas emotionally and he only has the Giver to share his feelings with, so this isolates Jonas from his community. Eventually, this burden becomes too much for him to bear and he leaves his community rather than stays and tries to live in isolation. Leaving is a great risk, as he has no idea what lies outside of the community's borders, but this "solution" is seen as the lesser evil than staying.

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Throughout The Giver, Jonas is assigned the prestigious position of Receiver of Memory for his community. As Receiver of Memory, Jonas gains insight and perspective into the true nature of his society when The Giver transfers memories to him during their private sessions. Jonas learns that in order to maintain stability, comfort, and safety throughout the community, the Committee of Elders has created a society void of joy, love, and excitement. With this unique knowledge of the past, Jonas begins to see his community as a restrictive, emotionless environment, where citizens live comfortable yet mundane lives. Jonas also learns about his community's dark secrets, such as the truth behind the term "release" and the missed opportunities to experience a world full of eye-opening possibilities.

Jonas's conflict concerns changing the nature of his community by releasing the memories into society in hopes that the memories will increase citizens' perspectives and alter his community for the better. Jonas also has to save Gabriel from being "released," and flees the community with him. Jonas's conflict is resolved when he escapes from the community with Gabriel, while The Giver stays back to guide and help the community deal with Jonas's released memories.

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In The Giver by Lois Lowry the main character is twelve year old Jonas.  The major problem that he faces is that he is given a prestigious apprenticeship where he learns secret information about his society, and then he realizes that his people are doing terrible things in order to keep everyone comfortable.

When Jonas is chosen Receiver of Memory, he is just as ignorant and ambivalent as the rest of the people in his community.  He begins to learn the truth about mankind and the past when he receives memories of war, hunger, pain and suffering from The Giver.

When Jonas comes upon Asher playing a war game, he simply cannot look at the game the same way after experiencing a memory of real war.

In his mind, Jonas saw again the face of the boy who had lain dying on a field and had begged him for water. He had a sudden choking feeling, as if it were difficult to breathe. (p. 134)

So Jonas’s new problem becomes that he knows more than everyone else, and no longer seems to fit in.  When Jonas asks to see the release of the newchild it is out of curiosity, but it changes him forever as “he saw the face of the lighthaired, bloodied soldier as life left his eye” (p. 150).

The memory came back. He killed it! My father killed it! Jonas said to himself, stunned at what he was realizing. He continued to stare at the screen numbly. (p. 150)

From that point on, Jonas has to both save Gabriel, who is scheduled to be released, and to return the community to sanity by releasing the memories back to them.

 

Lowry, Lois (1993-04-26). The Giver (Newbery Medal Book). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Kindle Edition.

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What type of conflict is the main conflict in The Giver?

There are many themes and conflicts in Lois Lowry's The Giver, but the most predominant one would be the conflict between individualism and social conformity--in other words, man versus society. 

In the community in which Jonas dwells, nothing is left up to chance. All elements of human life are strictly controlled and ritualized, creating a highly insular environment in which men and women are assigned spouses, jobs, rest days, and even non-biological children. Residents are not allowed to experience "stirrings" (or sexual feelings), do not marry for love, do not produce their own offspring, and are "released" (euthanized) when they reach old age. They also are incapable of feeling emotions and are unable to see color. In other words, their lives are highly compressed, regulated versions of a normal human life. They have forfeited individualism for "sameness."

After Jonas is named as the next Receiver, he is given the banished memories of the community--their joy, sadness, pain, love, etc. Realizing the truly dimensional human experience that his fellow residents are missing, Jonas decides that he must escape the community in order to release these memories back to their rightful owners. So, while the focus here is on man versus society, there is also an element of man for society; Jonas must defeat these rules by abandoning the community that has restricted people for so long, therein saving that community. 

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What type of conflict is the main conflict in The Giver?

To me, the main conflict in this book is man vs. society.  In this case, the "man" is Jonas.  Most of the conflict in the book comes as he tries to come to grips with what his society is like.  He eventually resolves the conflict by leaving the society.

I think that the main theme of the book ties in with this.  The theme, to me, is that people need to be allowed to be human.  They have to be allowed to have real feelings and make decisions for themselves.  The author is saying that it is really bad for people to always be protected and told what to do.

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In The Giver, what is The Giver's main problem. And how does he solve this problem.

To me, the main problem for the The Giver is to figure out how to get revenge on his society for what it had done to his daughter Rosemary.

As you will remember Rosemary was selected to be the apprentice Receiver but could not handle it.  She then asked to be released.  The Giver knows that that means she was killed.  Ever since then, I think, he has understood that something is deeply flawed about his society.

In this book, The Giver figures out that he can take revenge on society (or maybe try to fix it) by helping Jonas to escape.  He knows that Jonas will release the Memories if he escapes.  Having those memories will totally change (or destory) society.  This gives The Giver a way to have his revenge.

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What problem/conflict is the main character dealing with in The Giver?

Another possible answer is that the novel deals with being the same vs. being different. There's no doubt that Jonas is different from everyone else, and he is treated special, and different, and he's uncomfortable with that; lying is the thing he has the most problem with, but when he finds out that everyone lies, it devastates him. The fact that Jonas, or anyone, is different, causes problems with the society; Gabriel is nearly killed as a result of not fitting into the sameness.

It's important to consider, though, some of the things that this society is no doubt attempting to do by making everyone the same. People are to be healthy, intelligent, and everyone has a role in this society. The biggest problem with the society in The Giver, of course, is what happens to you if you're different, and most people would agree that it's not OK what this society does.

Dave Becker 

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What problem/conflict is the main character dealing with in The Giver?

Generally, the conflict is the individual vs. society. Specifically, Jonas is struggling against his community that has made everyone the same, taking away individuality. The communitiy has also taken away choice, emotions, and emotional relationships. Gabriel is scheduled to be "Released" because he isn't progressing as he should for his age. This is the event that causes Jonas to take Gabriel and leave the community.

On the other side of the conflict, the people have a community where there's no war, no conflict, and no problems. Everyone is given a role at the age of twelve to become a productive member of the community. The community runs smoothly as long as there is no outside interference, such as the plane that flies overhead.

 

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What is the inital conflict/problem faced by the main character in The Giver?

If you are really asking what the first problem that Jonas faces is, I would say the problem is how he will fit in to his society.  He is specifically worried about what job he will be assigned to at his Ceremony of Twelve.  At this point in the story, all he is really worried about is being a good member of the community.

But after he is selected as the new Receiver of Memory, his conflict soon changes.  Now the conflict is between him and the society as he finds out that he does not like the contrast between the things he sees in his memories and what he sees in his actual life.

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