In The Giver, what happens to the apple when Jonas throws it to Asher?

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The apple mysteriously changes when Jonas throws it to Asher in The Giver. He is unaware that he has the "Capacity to See Beyond" and is seeing the red color of the apple for the first time while playing catch.

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In The Giver, when Jonas throws the apple to Asher, Jonas notices something strange about the apple. He asks Asher if he has also noticed something change about the apple, but Asher is oblivious. Jonas is so surprised by what has happened, and which he cannot immediately describe, that he even takes the apple home with him, which is strictly taboo in his society. That is why he goes to the Recreation Director the next morning before school begins and apologizes for taking the apple from the recess play area.

While the apple is soaring from Jonas’s hand to Asher as they play catch with it, it changes in the air. It transitions from the same shade as Jonas’s tunic to something else for a slight moment. This strange event occurs four times and Jonas cannot believe his eyes. He asks Asher whether he noticed anything strange about the apple, but Asher has not seen the same thing that Jonas has.

At his home, Jonas examines the apple closely under a magnifying glass but cannot find anything strange about it. What we understand is that the natural world before sameness eliminated climates and colors and seasons is beginning to break through for Jonas. The moment is brief, but it unnerves him. Later, when he is with the Giver, he relates the incident, and the Giver understands that Jonas saw color.

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The event with the apple in chapter 3 is perhaps the first real indication that something is amiss with either Jonas or with his community. Readers are aware that the substance of an apple doesn't change, so when Jonas is throwing the apple with Asher and notices the "change," it presents a red flag for readers:

But suddenly Jonas had noticed, following the path of the apple through the air with his eyes, that the piece of fruit hadwell, this was the part that he couldn't adequately understandthe apple had changed. Just for an instant. It had changed in mid-air, he remembered. Then it was in his hand, and he looked at it carefully, but it was the same apple. Unchanged.

At this point in the story, it is unclear what exactly has happened to the apple, and it isn't until Jonas begins his training that the change is made more clear.

In chapter 12, he notices that Fiona's hair experiences this same change. Jonas can't decide what to make of it, but he decides to ask the Giver about it. To his surprise, the Giver provides a memory of a sled, and he asks Jonas to examine it closely. Jonas realizes that the sled has the same quality as the brief change he saw in the apple and in Fiona's hair. The Giver teaches Jonas that, long ago, objects had a quality called color. It is at this point that readers grasp that Sameness includes limiting the ability of citizens' sight; thus, citizens in Jonas's world only see in black and white.

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In chapter 3, Jonas remembers an odd experience he had while playing a game of catch with his close friend Asher. One day, Jonas and Asher were tossing an apple back and forth when suddenly the apple began to change in mid-air. Although the apple retained its same size and shape, Jonas distinctly noticed an instant change while it was suspended in mid-air. When Jonas examined the apple, it was the same shade as before. Throughout their game of catch, the apple mysteriously changed four times. However, Asher did not notice a change, which was extremely puzzling to Jonas.

Jonas ended up taking the apple home to examine it with a magnifying glass and an announcement was made the next day specifically directed at him. The Speaker notified Jonas and the rest of the community that all snacks must be consumed in the Recreational Area and not hoarded. Following the incident, Jonas continues to see objects strangely change, which happens when he looks at Fiona's hair and into the crowd of people at the December Ceremony. Once Jonas becomes the community's next Receiver of Memory, the Giver explains that he has the "Capacity to See Beyond", which is the ability to see in color. The change in the apple Jonas witnessed was him seeing the color red for the first time. Jonas also learns that Fiona has red hair and he was seeing the flesh tones in the crowd of people.

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In The Giver, Jonas and Asher are tossing an apple back and forth during recreation period. While they are playing catch with the apple, Jonas notices that the apple seems to have somehow changed, right in mid-air. He catches the apple, examines it closely, and finds absolutely nothing different about it.  But this apparent change happens four more times. What Jonas does not understand is that the apple has not changed at all, but that his ability to see the apple clearly has changed. He is developing the ability to see colors, with red being the first color he is able to see.  This is a fleeting ability at this point in the book, as evidenced by the change not being constant. And of course, Jonas has no vocabulary or conceptual understanding to talk about or even think about this change because the ability to see color has been taken away from the entire community, and he has never seen a color before.  (I imagine this as being like living in a world that resembles black and white photography.)  Until the Giver explains color to Jonas and begins to share more colors, Jonas is unable to understand what is happening to him.  Color is a symbol in the story of the beauty in life that has been taken away from the community, all in the interests of sameness and conformity. 

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In The Giver, what happened to the apple when Jonas threw it to Asher?

In chapter three, Jonas recalls a time when he was indirectly chastised over the announcements for taking an apple home from the recreation area, which is against the community's rules. When Jonas recalls the incident, he remembers playing catch that day with Asher, and they were throwing an apple back and forth. Suddenly, Jonas noticed a change in the apple while it was in mid-air. However, the apple changed back to normal when he caught it. As Jonas continued to play catch with the apple, it would continue to mysteriously change in mid-air. Jonas found the incident very strange and unsettling, which is why he decided to take the apple home from the recreation area without permission. At this point in the story, Jonas is unaware that he has the Capacity to See Beyond and was simply seeing the color red in the apple. Essentially, Jonas was witnessing the apple's natural color before Sameness while he was playing catch with Asher.

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In The Giver, what happened to the apple when Jonas threw it to Asher?

It changed colors, or rather, it seemed to. Instead of being the dull color Jonas had seen his whole life, the apple was, for a flash, actually red.

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