"Come Off Scot-free"

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Last Updated on May 8, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 129

Context: Panurge, visiting the land of the Furred Law-cats with Friar John, answers the Archduke Gripe-men-all's riddle and gives him a purse of gold in order to be set free. Friar John laments the gift of the gold and wonders if a few "cropped pieces of white cash" (silver) might...

(The entire section contains 129 words.)

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Context: Panurge, visiting the land of the Furred Law-cats with Friar John, answers the Archduke Gripe-men-all's riddle and gives him a purse of gold in order to be set free. Friar John laments the gift of the gold and wonders if a few "cropped pieces of white cash" (silver) might not have been enough to buy freedom. Panurge answers:

". . . How could I help it? . . . Did you not see how Gripe-men-all held his gaping velvet pouch, and every moment roared and bellowed, "By gold, give, give me out of hand; by gold, give, give, give me presently"? Now thought I to myself, we shall never come off scot-free; I'll e'en stop their mouths with gold, that the wicket may be opened and we may get out, the sooner the better. . . ."

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"How The Other Half Lives"