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"You're A Poor Benighted 'eathen But A First-class Fightin' Man"

(Magill's Quotations in Context)

Context: Typical of Kipling is his respect for any man who can put up a good fight. In "Fuzzy-Wuzzy" he extolls the courage of the natives of the Anglo-Egyptian Soudan. In 1884 the British lost a battle against the Soudanese, and this poem is written out of respect for the fighting zeal and ability of the natives whom the British Expeditionary Force had to face.

'E rushes at the smoke when we let drive,
An', before we know, 'e 's 'ackin' at our 'ead;
'E's all 'ot sand an' ginger when alive,
An' e' 's generally shammin' when 'e 's dead.
'E's a daisy, 'e 's a ducky, 'e 's a lamb!
'E's a injia-rubber idiot on the spree,
'E's the on'y thing that doesn't give a damn
For a Regiment o' British Infantree!
So 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your 'ome in the Soudan;
You're a poor benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man; . . .