In The Frogs, what qualities of Aeschylus could help reconstruct the polis?

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There's a scene in The Frogs where the rival Greek tragedians Aeschylus and Euripides face off in a competition to decide who's the best tragic poet. The contest takes place in Hades, and Dionysus, Greek god of the theater, will be the judge. The winner will get to be brought back to life and return to Athens.

For his part, Aeschylus emphasizes the noble, idealized characters in his plays. He presents them as heroic paragons of virtue, just the kind of people whose example you'd want to emulate if you were rebuilding an Athenian polis shattered by war and internecine conflict. But what ultimately swings the contest in Aeschylus' favor is his practical advice concerning how to save the city. Aeschylus's characters may be more idealized than those of his arch-rival Euripides, but because of their superior virtue they can form the basis of a new polis. This indicates the degree to which, for the ancient Greeks, virtue was not just an abstract principle but was intimately related to lived experience.

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Hmm. The centrality of the chorus would provide a foundation. It gives us a sense of how strong the voice of the community was in the polis. After that, the way Aeschylus allowed his play structures to develop provides a parallel with the larger city-state; he allows individuals to emerge over time. The content of his plays, with their blend of history and what we call myth (but which would have been shared belief for a lot of the audience—religion), but through a lens that allows him to comment on contemporary action, gives a good sense of how past, faith, and present interweave in the polis.

Now, within "The Frogs," he claims to strengthen the morality of his fellow citizens.

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