Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe

by Fannie Flagg

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Last Updated on July 29, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 217

Flagg was a spokesperson for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). What is the status of the ERA today? What happened?

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Does Flagg criticize capital punishment in the novel? Is it an effective or just criticism? What is your view of the death penalty? Conversely, does the novel argue in favor of justified homicide?

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Who is the Tommy Thompson to whom Fannie Flagg dedicates her book? How do you think he influenced Fannie Flagg? Who are some of her other southern influences?

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Latest answer posted June 4, 2016, 12:04 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Compare the experiences of the Peavey children. How do they handle the challenges of living in a racist society?

Try a recipe or two of Sipsey's included with the book. While cooking, consider the allegorical role of food in the novel. For example, consider the significance of the community—from Georgia and Alabama—eating a murdered wife-beater cooked into a black man's barbecue.

React to the following statement Flagg made in an interview with Samuel S. Vaughan: "I tend to rail against the current fashion in American culture of glamorizing only very young, pretty girls and completely ignoring the most wonderful and sexiest of women, those who are adult. I find there is nothing more attractive than a genuinely adult man or woman."

What is domestic violence? How has society's view of domestic violence changed since 1929?

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