The French and Indian War (The Seven Years' War)

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How did the French and Indian War alter England's relationship with its American colonies?

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The French and Indian War changed the relationship between England and its American colonies in that its outcome eliminated the colonies' need for the British military and led to the Proclamation of 1763, the Quartering Act, and various taxes, all of which angered the colonists and contributed to the American Revolution.

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The French and Indian War changed the relationship between the American colonies and Great Britain in two pivotal ways.

Most importantly, once the French were expelled from American territories and the Native Americans could no longer count on them as allies, a great threat lifted for the English colonies. They...

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no longer had to worry that the French would take them over. At this point, they had no need of the British: once the French were gone, the Americans did not need British military might to back them up.

Hereafter, the British became a nuisance, a hindrance rather than a help. Adding to this problem, the British began to make themselves even more of a burden by insisting the Americans contribute to paying for the costly French and Indian war. The British reasoned that since the war had been largely fought for their benefit, the colonists should help defray its cost. This (and other economic issues in Britain) led the British to impose new tariffs and also tighten up on their policy of salutary neglect.

Under salutary neglect, the British had turned a blind eye to the many American violations of tariff rules and trading barriers that the Americans were legally supposed to respect. After the war, however, the British government began to tighten up on collecting tariffs and enforcing the laws on the books. This incited the Americans, who were used to lax policies.

Eventually—and ironically—Britain's successful war against the French led to the American Revolution and the separation of Britain and the colonies.

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The French and Indian War changed the relationship between the British and the colonists. As a result of this war, the British got most of France’s land east of the Mississippi River. Once the war ended, a series of laws were passed to deal with changes brought about by this war. The colonists wanted to go west to settle in the land Britain got from France. However, the Native Americans were threatening violence. Thus, the British passed the Proclamation of 1763 that prevented the colonists from settling this land.

After this law was passed, things got worse. The British passed the Quartering Act that required the colonists to provide housing for the British troops. The colonists were upset that they had to provide housing for soldiers to enforce a law they didn’t want. Then the British passed tax laws believing the colonists should pay for some of the costs of running the colonies. The colonists opposed these laws because they were passed without their consent. The colonists had no representatives in Parliament who could vote for these taxes.

Eventually, violence broke out between the British and colonists. In the Boston Massacre, five colonists were killed. After the Boston Tea Party occurred and the Intolerable Acts were passed, the battles of Lexington and Concord took place. Soon after, the Declaration of Independence was passed. This led to the Revolutionary War.

While the British nor the colonists could have know it at the time, the British victory in the French and Indian War would dramatically change the relationship between the British and colonists.

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One of the biggest impacts the French and Indian War had on British-American relations was economic.  In order to pay for the immense cost of the war, the British imposed new taxes on the colonists.  The justification was that since the war was fought to protect the colonists from the French, they should have to pay the cost.  While the colonists were certainly grateful, they did not agree with the premise that they should have to shoulder the weight of war debts.  Additionally, some colonists argued that the British would have fought that war regardless of whether or not the colonists were there, since at heart it was a war over British and French territory.  

Three of the taxes imposed on the colonists were the tariff of imported goods, the sugar act, and the stamp act, which were all designed to tax American imports and exports.  Many staunch patriots rejected the premise of these taxes, and relations between Britain and the US soured.  These taxes raised tensions between the two which were some of the long-term causes to the Revolutionary War.

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The French and Indian War changed this relationship by making it a great deal worse.  In fact, the war can be said to have led to the revolution.

First, the war took the French out of North America.  The colonists no longer had to fear being taken by France if they were to break free from Britain.

Second and more importantly, the war cost a huge amount of money. The British felt that the colonies should pay some part of that sum.  The colonists had not been taxed as heavily as the people in Britain itself and the British government felt this should change.  The taxes that the British then imposed on the colonies were the major cause of the discontent that led to the Revolutionary War.

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How did the French and Indian war affect the relationship between Britain and its American Colonies?

The French and Indian War affected the relationship between the colonists and the British. At first, the colonists were pleased the British were there to fight this conflict against the French and Native Americans. It gave the colonists a sense that the British would protect them. However, after the war ended, the relationship between the British and the colonists began to deteriorate.

Once the war ended, the colonists and the British began to see things very differently. The colonists wanted to move to the new lands Britain gained from France. However, the British believed the Native Americans would attack the colonists so they passed the Proclamation of 1763. This prohibited the colonists from moving to this area. The colonists weren’t happy with this. When the British asked the colonists to provided housing for troops who would enforce the Proclamation of 1763, the colonists became unhappier. Eventually, the British wanted the colonists to pay for some of the cost of running the colonies so new tax laws were passed. This led to more unhappiness. Eventually conflict broke out, and we declared our independence from Britain. Thus, the end of the French and Indian War ultimately led to the end of our colonial relationship with Great Britain.

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How did the French and Indian War change the ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies?

The French and Indian War set the stage for future events that no one could ever have imagined.The economic practice of mercantilism, which insured profit only to the mother country was the accepted practice between England and her colonies. As long as these economic policies were met, England left much of the day to day governing of the colonies up to the colonies. It was this "salutory neglect" that ultimately led to the ideological differences between England and the colonies. England won the war, but it paid a great price for that victory. England was bankrupted, and as a result had no choice but to look to her colonies to regain financial stability. The pressures of taxation and naval restrictions imposed by the crown and Parliament, were viewed by the colonists as tyrannical acts. Although the colonies were on a path to becoming "Americanized" they held the lessons of Magna Carta, the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 close to their heart. In their eyes, "Englishmen had rights" under the laws of the mother country. It was only when these laws were usurpted by the crown that the colonies had no choice but to protest their discontent. The political authority that England executed over the colonies after so many years of neglect led to the ideological differences that would ultimately result in the American Revolution. 

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How did the French and Indian War change the ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies?

The British paid for the French and Indian War, which took place exclusively on the North American continent. However, the costs for the war were high. The British thought of America as a colony. and felt they should be able to tax Americans as they taxed other colonies. Consequently, the British began to impose taxes on the Americans to pay for the war. Americans believed they should be treated like other British citizens. That meant they should be allowed representatives in Parliament and have a say on whether or not they should be taxed. They protested vehemently. Their slogan was "no taxation without representation". Eventually, this led to the American Revolution because Americans refused to be ruled without representation in Parliament.

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How did the French and Indian War cause the colonists to rethink their relationship with Britain?

The British generals in America during the French and Indian War did not value the colonial troops who fought alongside them. After the war, the British rewarded the Native Americans who fought on their side with the Proclamation Line of 1763 while the colonists were punished by this arbitrary line that they were not allowed to cross. British officials got to see firsthand how openly the colonists flouted taxation and shipping laws and after the war they sought to make the colonists pay their fair share of the bill--after all, the British troops were stationed in America for the colonists' benefit, at least according to Parliament. The colonists felt disrespected by the taxation without their consent and openly began to consider their independence.

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How did the French and Indian War cause the colonists to rethink their relationship with Britain?

Because of the French and Indian War, which was fought on American soil, Britain felt it was only right that the colonists foot some of the bill for the war that was fought to protect them. 

Once Britain decided to impose taxes on the colonies to collect some revenue to pay the war bill, the colonists attitude toward Britain changed.  They began to feel that they were being persecuted, being held responsible to pay for a war that Britain would have waged anyway, since they were fighting France for territory in North America.

Not only did the colonists resent being held financially accountable for the war, they discovered that they were competent soldiers.  They had lost many men in the fight, but George Washington fought in the French and Indian War and this military service prepared him to lead the Revolution as Commander in Chief of the military.

Events during the French and Indian War and its aftermath planted the seeds for the American Revolution.

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How did the French and Indian War affect the colonies’ relationship with Britain?

The French and Indian War was very destabilizing for the relationship between the colonies and Great Britain. This was true for a number of reasons. For one thing, many British officers and royal governors were unimpressed with the colonial assemblies, many of whom refused to contribute funds to the war effort. These tensions continued into the postwar era, when Parliament attempted to fund the debt incurred during the war by placing a direct tax (the infamous Stamp Act) on the colonies. They also attempted to raise money by more rigorously enforcing trade restrictions. Both of these initiatives, especially direct taxation, sparked the imperial crisis that would degenerate into revolution. Another source of friction resulting from the war was the acquisition of the Ohio Valley from the French. American settlers and especially land speculators had long eyed this territory, and assumed it would be theirs for the taking after it was opened by the Treaty of Paris. But friction between Native peoples and settlers in the region convinced the Crown to close the area to settlement with the Proclamation of 1763. Colonists were bitterly disappointed by this development, perhaps as much so as by the Stamp Act itself. So, in short, the aftermath of the French and Indian War caused a crisis in Great Britain's relationship with the North American colonies.

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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter (change) the political, economic, and ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies?

It may be true that most colonists were fine with being a colony of Britain. Other than annoyance at taxes, they felt relatively safe and protected. They did not necessarily buy into the ideology of the revolution. However I do think that a significant portion of the population did sympathize with the revolution, even if it was a minority.
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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter (change) the political, economic, and ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies?

If I remember right this was a DBQ question from an AP US History test.  You have ideological capitalized, so let me focus on that one in particular.  Ideology is the study of belief systems, and the British were a monarchy at the time of the French and Indian War.  Some historians view the war, and the taxes that followed it, as a breaking point for Colonial-British relations, that at least some of the colonists adopted a more democratic approach, demanding their representation in Parliament and individual rights as English citizens.

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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter (change) the political, economic, and ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies?

This is way long of a question... But the idea is that the colonists were happy to be British up until the war.  After that, they started to become angry at the British.  The war led to the Revolution.

Politically and ideologically it made the colonists feel more connected to one another and less connected to England.

Economically, it caused GB to need to tax the colonies and those taxes are the ones that made the Americans angry.

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How did the French and Indian War change relations between the colonies and Britain?  

The French and Indian War changed the relationship between the colonies and Great Britain in many ways. One was that the territories gained by the British as a result of the war led to almost immediate conflict, as the Crown tried to avert war with Native Americans by stopping settlement west of the Appalachians. This created tensions between the British ministry and western settlers as well as wealthy land speculators.

Another change in the imperial relationship was a result of the tremendous debt incurred by the British government, as well as the additional expenses of administering (and stationing soldiers in) the vast territories gained as a result of the Treaty of Paris. The British tried to service this debt first by tightening restrictions on trade with the colonies and, at least once, by passing an "internal" tax in the form of the Stamp Act. The Stamp Act was highly controversial, and met with violent protest, because it seemed to violate an age-old protection enjoyed by British subjects--the right against taxation without representation. Additional duties on imported goods did not meet with these theoretical objections, but they did hurt the pocketbooks of colonial merchants and ordinary city-dwellers. Moreover, to many people, they represented a pattern of abuses that constituted an assault on colonial liberties.

There were other ways in which the French and Indian War altered the relationship--British ministers were unimpressed, for example, with the willingness of colonial legislatures to provide funding for their own defense, and colonial militia bristled at the attempts of British officers to impose harsh discipline on them. But the imposition of the Proclamation of 1763, the Stamp Act, and other controversial measures was primarily responsible for driving a wedge between Britain and its colonies in the wake of the French and Indian War.

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How did the French and Indian War change the ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies? Include supporting details.

Prior to the French and Indian War the relationship between the British colonies and Britain was rooted in mercantilism. This economic trade sysytem was designed to enrich the mother country by using the colonies as the agent by which all the new resources from the new world could be allocated and sent to Britain.  As long as the colonies provided the resources Britain left the colonies alone to govern themselves. The colonies lived under this  'Salutory Neglect' for about 169 years or the end of the war. Although the British won the war, they did so at a great cost, the King was practically bankrupted. As a result the King and his Parliament began to pass laws that restricted colonial lofe. From taxes to the importation of goods the British crown seemed to be infringing upon the rights of the colonials as Englishmen. These impositions were viewed by the colonists as tyrannical because the colonists had no say in any of the matters. As far back as the Magna Carta of 1215 through the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 the King was subjected to the will of his people. British subjects voted on such matters as increased taxes and since the colonists were denied this without representation in the Parliament they began to resent the crown and their views regarding their position as colonials began to change.  It is worth noting that their very arguments mirrored the arguments of the British people in 1215 and 1688-89.

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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter the ideological ways of thinking between Britain and its American colonies?

Since the founding of the earliest British colonies in North America, the colonists had almost always been given a large degree of autonomy over how they governed themselves. Given the great distance between the lawmakers in London and their subjects in America, this was necessary if things were to run smoothly in the colonies. The colonists considered themselves to be English and fervently supported the British fight against the French during the war. They saw it as a fight over their right to settle the continent and therefore were often eager to contribute.

That is why many colonists were very upset with changes in British policy after the war. The conflict had been very expensive. The British racked up a lot of debt in waging the war and felt that, since it was largely fought to protect their colonies, the colonists should help pay for it.

Parliament began to levy significant taxes on the colonies, something that they had never done on this scale before. While the Navigation Acts, which restricted trade, had been in effect for some time, the practice of salutary neglect meant that they had seldom been enforced. The colonists had grown accustomed to doing things their way. However, the financial strains that Great Britain was now feeling meant that they felt that they could no longer govern their colonies with such a loose hand. Old laws that had been mostly ignored were now being enforced, and new taxes under the infamous Stamp Act and Townshend Acts were levied.

Furthermore, the British took a greater role in restricting the settlement of their colonists. The greatest spoil of the French and Indian War was perhaps gaining control over the Ohio River Valley. Many colonists were eager to settle that area. However, the British government was worried that such settlement would disrupt the delicate balance they had with the Native Americans there. Consequently, they forbade English settlers from moving west of the Appalachian Mountains with the Royal Proclamation of 1763. This was the first time that the government had so greatly restricted the movement of their colonists. As you might imagine, this greatly upset many colonists who felt it infringed on their freedoms.

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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter the ideological ways of thinking between Britain and its American colonies?

The French and Indian War transformed the relationship between Britain and its colonies and ultimately set into motion the sequence of events that would lead to the American Revolution.

Throughout the long span of colonial history, North American colonists had tended to regard themselves as loyal subjects of England. However, the distance which separated the colonies from Europe meant that (for most of that history), the colonies were largely free to act and govern themselves with a great deal of autonomy.

However, what you need to recognize is that the French and Indian War was only one part of a much larger global struggle, often referred to as the Seven Years War. This conflict put tremendous strain on the British economy, which resulted in key changes to colonial policy.

In 1764, Britain passed the Sugar Act, which greatly strengthened the enforcement of British mercantile laws (thus directly threatening colonial smugglers). The following year, in 1765, the Stamp Act would place all official forms of documentation under taxation. These sorts of interventions created a great deal of resentment and concern within the colonies. However, this only marks the beginning of a longer trajectory, in which tensions between Britain and the colonies would continue to intensify, eventually resulting in the Revolution.

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In what ways did the French and Indian War alter the ideological ways of thinking between Britain and its American colonies?

The French and Indian War altered the ideological thoughts of both the British and the colonists. While the British always believed they could run the colonies as they saw fit to do, after the war ended, the British wanted the colonies to share in some of the costs of operating the colonies. As a result, various tax laws were passed to help raise money to run the colonies. These tax laws were the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. Additionally, the British decided to limit colonial movement to the west by issuing the Proclamation of 1763.

After the French and Indian War, the colonists began to believe the British were being unreasonable. They felt that since the colonies were Britain’s colonies, they should bear the cost of running them. When times were simpler and the British made a lot of money from the colonies, there wasn’t a rush to share the profits with the colonies. At the very minimum, if the colonists were going to have to pay taxes to help offset the cost of running the colonies, they should, at least, have representatives in Parliament that could speak about and vote on these taxes. Since the colonists didn’t have representatives in Parliament, they felt the taxes were unfair.

Another change in the thinking of the colonists was the willingness to take actions against the unfair taxes and the unfair laws. The colonists refused to buy British goods until the Stamp Act was removed. They also took this action when the taxes from the Townshend Acts were established. When the Townshend Acts were passed, some colonists also started making their own products that could have a long-term, negative impact on British businesses. Some colonists refused to follow the Proclamation of 1763 that was issued right after the French and Indian War ended. The colonists were more willing to openly protest British actions through their own reactions to these British actions.

After the French and Indian War ended, both sides saw their ideological way of thinking shift.

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