Frederick Douglass Lesson Plans

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  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass eNotes Lesson Plan

    Learning Objectives: By the end of this unit, students should be able to describe the connection Douglass makes between education and freedom; explain Douglass’s views on the religious hypocrisy of Christian slave owners; identify the morally degrading and dehumanizing effects of slavery on both slaves and slave owners; summarize Douglass’s comparison...

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  • What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? Rhetorical Devices Lesson Plan

    Ethos, Logos, and Pathos as Rhetorical Devices: This lesson focuses on Douglass’s use of ethos, logos, and pathos as rhetorical devices in “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” Students will analyze passages from the speech and explain how Douglass employs appeals to ethos, logos, and pathos to...

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  • Reconstruction Rhetorical Analysis Activity

    This activity gives students an opportunity to practice examining and analyzing rhetorical appeals. Effective appeals address all aspects of the rhetorical situation in any text or speech: the speaker, the audience, and the message. With this rhetorical situation in mind, Aristotle sought a means to most effectively convey ideas. He...

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  • What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? Rhetorical Analysis Activity

    This activity gives students an opportunity to practice examining and analyzing rhetorical appeals. Effective appeals address all aspects of the rhetorical situation in any text or speech: the speaker, the audience, and the message. With this rhetorical situation in mind, Aristotle sought a means to most effectively convey ideas. He...

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  • Reconstruction Rhetorical Devices Lesson Plan

    Analyzing Rhetorical Devices for Persuasive Effect: This lesson plan focuses on Douglass’s use of rhetorical devices in arguing his position regarding the political reconstruction of the South after the Civil War. Students will identify the thesis in Douglass’s essay, locate examples of antithesis, parallelism, and alliteration in the text, and...

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