Felix Paul Greve Biography

Biography

Frederick Philip Grove was born Felix Paul Greve on February 14, 1879, in Radomno, Prussia. Grove’s most effective fictions were a result of the first thirty years of his life. His parents were middle-class citizens of Hamburg, and he attended the University of Bonn for a few years before dropping out for financial reasons and embarking on a career as a freelance writer and translator. Grove may have known André Gide and others in turn-of-the-century Paris literary circles, and he certainly did write and publish poetry, fiction, and even drama in addition to his literary criticism and extensive translation.{$S[A]Greve, Felix Paul;Grove, Frederick Philip}

Grove’s migration to North America, in 1909 or 1910, provided him with new subject matter for his fiction. Whether he rode the rails as an itinerant workman, as he often said, is open to question. Most certainly he could have done so for only a year or two, and not for the much longer period suggested in A Search for America and reiterated in his autobiography. One can only speculate about his reasons for coming to America and for adopting so elaborate a disguise—of name, of parentage, even of the year of his birth. Perhaps he wished to transcend his modest social station, or to elude the law or creditors—Grove had spent a year in a Bonn prison for fraud—or perhaps to escape a constraining marriage.

In 1912, Grove was hired as a public schoolteacher in rural Haskett,...

(The entire section is 503 words.)

Biography

(Survey of Novels and Novellas)

Frederick Philip Grove was born Felix Paul Greve on February 14, 1879, in Radomno, Poland—on what was then the border with Prussia. Grove’s most effective fictions were a result of these first thirty years of his life. His parents were middle-class citizens of Hamburg, and he attended the University of Bonn for a few years before dropping out for financial reasons and embarking on a career as a freelance writer and translator. Grove may have known André Gide and others in early twentieth century Paris literary circles, and he certainly did write and publish poetry, fiction, and even drama in addition to his literary criticism and extensive translation.

Grove’s migration to North America, in 1909 or 1910, provided for him a new source of subject matter for his fiction. Whether he rode the rails as an itinerant workman, as he often said, is open to question. Most certainly he could have done so for only a year or two, and not for the much longer period suggested in In Search of America and reiterated in the autobiography. One can only speculate about his reasons for coming to America and for adopting so elaborate a disguise—of name, of parentage, even of the year of his birth. Perhaps he wished to transcend his modest social station, or to elude the law or creditors—Grove had spent a year in Bonn prison for fraud—or perhaps to escape a constraining marriage.

In 1912, Grove was hired as a public schoolteacher in rural...

(The entire section is 514 words.)