What is the moral of Fahrenheit 451?

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To me, the moral of this story is that people need to fight to keep their humanity.  If they do not care about intellectual and emotional life, it will be taken away from them.

In this story, Guy Montag and people like him have very unhappy lives.  They do not have serious thoughts and they do not have emotional relationships.  Why is this?  It is because people have stopped caring about stuff like that.  People have chosen mindless entertainment over things that will make them think.  They have chosen to watch the parlor walls and things like that instead of hanging out with friends and family in the real world.

So Bradbury is warning us -- if you don't think, you will lose the option of thinking.  If you just watch TV and stuff instead of interacting with people, no one will care about each other.  He is telling us that we need to think and to care about other people or we will end up in a dystopian world like Montag's.

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I think another theme is alienation and loneliness.  Even though Montag lives with his wife in a large city and has an important job, he really is alone.  His wife spends her time plugged into the TV walls living vicariously through them.  Montag doesn't really have his loneliness is broken until he meets Clarisse.  She makes him realize how alienated he has become to the world around him.  He takes being alive for granted.  Faber too helps relieve some of this.  Of course, when Montag begins to smuggle books into his home, he becomes further alienated from society.

However, after Montag has fled the city and it has been destroyed, he has his alienation relieved by his initiation into the book people.  While he has lost so very much by the novel's resolution, Montag has at last found a real purpose to his life, that ends his alienation and loneliness.

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What can we learn from Fahrenheit 451?

One important lesson from Fahrenheit 451 concerns the danger of ignorance. Most of the citizens in the novel value endless entertainment—with entire walls of their homes serving as virtual television screens— do not read books (which are ritually burned), and are kept in perpetual ignorant bliss. There is war going on in the world, but people have become numb to it. They are encouraged to forget the past, obey authority, and watch their screens. Those who ask too many questions or refuse to conform are either disappeared, burned, destroyed by a mechanical hound, or forced to hide outside of the city like hobos.

There is much else to learn from Fahrenheit, of course. Though written more than a half century ago, many of its critiques apply today—an age in which we have more technology than author Ray Bradbury could have imagined when the novel was published.

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What can we learn from Fahrenheit 451?

Fahrenheit 451 offers several pointed critiques of modern life. First is the alienation and shallowness of thought and culture that Bradbury is suggesting could accompany the growth of mass culture and technology. In the book, people, especially Montag's wife, have embraced these things to the exclusion of independent thought. Bradbury also worries about the effects of apathy, another consequence of modern life. People have ceased to care what is really true, or that they lack basic freedoms. The novel reflects contemporary concerns, as it was written in the midst of the 1950s, a time when technological marvels like the television were popping up in people's homes. It was also a time of heightened concerns about the spread of communism, when politicians such as Joseph McCarthy stoked popular fears about political nonconformists.

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What can we learn from Fahrenheit 451?

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury can teach the reader that curiosity is a rooted trait within humans. Within the text, the protagonist Montag evolves from an unhappy average citizen to a rebel in hiding. Montag’s curiosity connects to the reader in that the idea that something is forbidden (in this case, books and ideas) often makes it more attractive. This has been seen repeatedly throughout history, such as during prohibition. Furthermore, Montag is relatable to the reader in that his defiance and curiosity throughout the story are ultimately what set him free. It is ironic that within this dystopian society, books are to be burned, and yet as a reader you are partaking in what would be considered punishable by law in this unpleasant futuristic world. Ultimately, the lesson that can be taken from the text is that curiosity about the world and the things within it will always light fire within people; therefore, rules and regulations will continuously be challenged and changed.

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What are the moral lessons for Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451?

I think there is a moral lesson in this book about instant gratification. The book serves as a warning to readers about the dangers of instant and easy gratification. I feel that the best character that illustrates this warning is Montag's wife, Mildred. She has found meaning and happiness in life by seeking out the easiest and most mindless ways to achieve that happiness. She takes pills to help her mood, and she fills all of her time by watching television. Those lives that she watches on TV are more important to her than the reality that she lives in because her fictional world makes her happier than her real life.

"Happiness is important. Fun is everything. And yet I kept sitting there saying to myself, I'm not happy, I'm not happy."

"I am." Mildred's mouth beamed. "And proud of it."

She can't fathom why her husband would even consider anything that involves extra work in order to find happiness. The thought of reading a book and engaging that much mental horsepower to find pleasure boggles her mind.

This moral lesson about finding pleasure and happiness outside of a person's living room is echoed in Bradbury's short story "The Pedestrian" as well. In that story, the protagonist is arrested for going on a contemplative stroll around his neighborhood. Fahrenheit 451 supports that same idea. Bradbury wants his readers to continue to find happiness and meaning in slower and more contemplative activities. That's what Montag is searching for, and that's why Clarisse is so much more interesting to him than his own wife. She still exhibits wonder, curiosity, and independent thought.

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What are the moral lessons for Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451?

I do not necessarily disagree with what the first answer says, but I think that it misses the biggest moral lesson of all in this book.

To me, the moral is that people must love learning and thinking and books or else those things will disappear.  After all, it is not the government that comes up with the idea of censorship -- it is the people who demand it.  This book tells us that it is up to people to protect their freedoms or the freedoms will be taken away -- not necessarily by the government, but possibly by their fellow citizens.

So Bradbury wants us to be more contemplative and less interested in excitement and easy pleasures.

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What are the moral lessons for Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451?

1.  Censorship is evil: it is an intrusion on freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and banning books is academic and moral neglect

2.  Books must be protected at all costs: they cannot be changed, amended, rated with labels, stripped or watered down, or sampled.  They must be preserved as a whole to protect the moral integrity of both art and artist.

3.  A government that bans books is a fascist or totalitarian regime whose citizens must band together, rebel, and preserve knowledge and academic freedom.

4.  Nuclear war threatens to destroy the planet.  The only thing worse than a world without books is a world burned to ashes by nuclear warfare.  In the 1950s, nuclear holocaust was a real threat to global annihilation.

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