In Fahrenheit 451, why does Montag want to read books?

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Guy Montag is an intelligent man who has been denied an outlet for his intellectual curiosity. Instead, he has been raised to follow rules and not question authority. He is in the position of enforcing regulations that he does not fully understand, which makes him increasingly uncomfortable. Montag astutely recognizes that if his society were fair and just, then openly questioning the rules would not constitute a danger. Furthermore, he sees that people around him, including his wife, are miserable; therefore, denying them access to books has not created anything approaching a utopia. Although he lacks the tools to verbalize his dissatisfaction, he correctly reasons that the things that are being destroyed must hold the key to his questions.

After conversing with Faber, Montag also becomes more interested in what the books contain. He is intrigued by the notion that, taken collectively, they might have a solution for the malaise that affects his society. Gradually, Montag realizes that no single book, or even all the books remaining on Earth, would provide the answer. Although he is forced to make a decision when he is apprehended for hiding books, he also takes initiative to join the other book people. The novel recounts Montag’s gradually learning that “reading” constitutes one’s continuing to ask questions and to share the information one gains by doing so.

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Montag is overcome by insatiable curiosity regarding the forbidden object.

Montag has several conversations with eccentric 17-year-old neighbor Clarisse who challenges his right to authority over others and also who questions his happiness. Montag begins to think about his station in life and about his feelings of happiness as related to his society.  Montag wonders more about this feeling of unhappiness after Millie's suicide attempt and the cavalier manner in which the medical team take care of her mental state.

Montag is intrigued by the woman, Mrs Blake, who decides to burn herself along with her illegal library of books. Montag steals one of the books from the fire. Beatty comes to see him after he does not report to work and explains just what it is that firemen do to help society. He is told that he has 24 hours to satiate his curiosity before the firemen will burn the book for him.

He attempts to read to Millie which makes her extremely uncomfortable. But he is such a poor reader that the book makes little sense to him.

Montag is not sure just exactly what is in the books that is to be feared. Montag rejects the authoritarian control that the Firemen have on society. One of the quotes in the book states that not all men are born equal, but they are made equal through the society that does not allow discomfort caused by intelectualism or the discomfort caused by the confusion of different ideas presented in books.

Montag desires to read as a way to rebel against the authority of his society. Montag seeks out the help of Faber who is very suspicious of his desire to learn to read.  Faber tells Montag that learning to read will only allow him to "nibble around the edges" and that society will crash from the pending war.

Montag finally rejects his society and runs away as a fugitive only to be embraced by a society of "living books".

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Montag's desire to read books is a slow process that gradually builds to the actual act of reading one.  At the beginning of the story, he already has a book hid in his house, because as he walks into the house the first time we meet him,

"he stood looking up at the ventilator grille in the hall and suddenly remembered that something lay hidden behind the grille."

He only looks up there after he pondered Clarisse's question of, "Are you happy?"  So here, Bradbury seems to be alluding to the fact that Montag was not happy, and his unhappiness has led him to books; perhaps he feels that they hold the answer.  His desire to read books is there even before the novel begins.  However, Clarisse sparks his interest more, along with Mildred's suicided attempt.  He realizes, through these two events, that he indeed is not happy, and neither is his wife, or most people that he knows, for that matter.  But Clarisse is; she's happy, and perhaps books are the reason why.

While all of this is mulling around in  his head, he is called to burn Mrs. Blake's house.  Mrs. Blake, rather than leaving her books, chooses to be burnt alive with them.  This really gets to Montag; he thinks that if someone is willing to die for books, then there HAS to be something in them, there just has to be.  So, this adds to his interest.  Then is the visit from Beatty, where he explains the entire history of firemen, and how books became unpopular.  Then at the end of his lecture, he basically gives Montag permission to read:  "We let the fireman keep the book twenty-four hours."  Montag takes full advantage of that time-frame, and tries to read with Mildred.  He lists all of the things wrong in the world, and tells Millie, "An hour, a day, two hours, with these books, and maybe..." thinking that somehow they hold the answer to life's miseries.  It is a pretty futile process though, as Mildred complains the entire time and is upset that he isn't going to work.  Frustrated with her and her friends, he seeks out Faber, who confirms everything he has been suspecting about books.  From there on out, he has made his decision; books are worth fighting for, and he takes that conviction to the end of the book.

So, through a slow, gradual process, Montag goes from secretly hiding a book but never reading it, to wanting to read it, to openly reading it, to planning subterfuge in order to bring books back, then open rebellion in the name of books.

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Why does Montag think books will make him happy in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury?

In Fahrenheit 451, during a conversation with Faber, Montag reveals why he thinks books will make him happy:

We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy. Something's missing. I looked around. The only thing I positively knew was gone was the books I'd burned in ten or twelve years. So I thought books might help.

In other words, Montag believes books can bring him happiness because everything else in his society has failed. Neither his marriage to Mildred nor his job as a fireman nor his access to a wide range of entertainments make Montag happy. As such, Montag idealizes books as his last hope of achieving happiness. 

Reading books also provides an opportunity for expression and creativity, two things Montag desperately craves. He tells Faber he just wants "someone to hear" what he says. He realizes his society is not interested in listening to the thoughts and opinions of its citizens and this provides Montag with another reason to believe in the power of books. 

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Why does Montag think books will make him happy in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury?

I think that there are two things that you can point to that made him think this.

First, he realizes that in his day, people are generally not happy.  He knows that, in the past, people were happy.  He tries to figure out what is different now and the main thing he can think of is that there used to be books and now there are not.

Second, there is the example of the old lady who burns herself along with her books.  Montag thinks that, if she was willing to do that, there must be something important and compelling about books.

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Why does Montag take a book into the parlor in Fahrenheit 451?

I'm assuming you mean the part of the story where Montag brings a book of poems into the parlor where his wife, Millie and a few of her friends are enjoying the pre-programmed comedy showing on the parlor walls. At this point in the novel, Montag is seriously conflicted. He wants to shake up the world and ask serious questions and see if there is any meaning left to be saved in the world, and if books can help. So he enters the parlor and asks questions, ultimately reading a poem. He has enlisted an ally by now, in the form of Faber, the old teacher he once confronted as a fireman. Now, Faber is helping him with the listening device he invented, but warns Montag to take it slow. He can't, and ends up frightening the women. The reader might consider Montag too far gone to approach this sensibly. He's burned too many books, seen too many things to behave rationally or cautiously anymore.
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In Fahrenheit 451, what starts Montag on his interest in books?

As a fireman, tasked with burning any books discovered in society, Montag starts with a very specific view on books. After he meets Clarisse, and after his wife Mildred overdoses on sleeping pills (it is unclear if she did it on purpose or not), he begins to really question the societal ban on books. When burning an illegal library, with his thoughts disturbed by his recent experiences, he accidentally reads a line from a book:

In all the rush and fervour, Montag had only an instant to read a line, but it blazed in his mind for the next minute as if stamped there with fiery steel. "Time has fallen asleep in the afternoon sunshine." He dropped the book. Immediately, another fell into his arms.
(Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, Google Books)

While his changing perspective begins when he meets Clarisse, his direct interest in books, the very thing he is charged with destroying, starts in this scene. The power of written words, especially of images and ideas instead of the meaningless platitudes from television, begins his new interest in reading. He steals a book, almost without realizing it, and from then on his personality changes from a blind member of society to a free-thinking individual.

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In Fahrenheit 451, why do you think Montag rescues some of his books before fleeing?

I'm assuming this is referring to when he's on the run after torching his own house, then Beatty and the Mechanical Hound.  He found four books that Mildred missed by the garden fence, then took off down the alley with them as police sirens were getting closer.

Earlier he and Faber had an idea to plant books in firemen's homes and report them in an attempt to change the culture, and this is what he did with these books.  On page 130 (in my novel) Bradbury writes about planting them in Mr. Black's home: "He hid the books in the kitchen and moved from the house again to the alley...", then phoned in the report from a nearby store.  He soon heard the sirens of the Salamander coming and was pleased with the thought of Mrs. Black standing alone in the cold as her house was burned to the ground.

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