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Examples of alliteration in the beginning of Fahrenheit 451

Summary:

Examples of alliteration at the beginning of Fahrenheit 451 include phrases like "the autumn leaves blew over the moonlit pavement" and "the cold November wind." These instances use the repetition of consonant sounds to create a rhythmic and poetic effect, enhancing the novel's descriptive quality and setting the tone for the story.

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What is an example of alliteration from Fahrenheit 451?

In the novel's opening scene, Guy Montag, the protagonist, walks out of the fire station. What commences is a run of alliteration with "s" sounds:

"He walked out of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent air-propelled train slid soundlessly...rising to the suburb."

It could be said that the "s" sounds evoke the sibilant sound of the ignition of a fire.  This is fitting because Montag is a fireman who revels in burning books and the houses of people that own them.  The alliteration's placement here becomes a sort of soundtrack to develop his characterization.  In fact, in the paragraph prior to the alliteration describing his journey home, Montag is described as having a "fiery smile" that never leaves his face, even when he is alone in the dark.  Guy Montag seems, in this opening vignette, to be the embodiment of the hiss of fire.

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What is an example of alliteration from Fahrenheit 451?

Alliteration is the repetition of like consonant sounds in poetry or literature.  Writers use alliteration to emphasize text and to create rhythm and mood in their writing.  When a writer uses alliteration, words that sound alike are usually put close together, and the repeating consonant sound usually starts each word.

I downloaded the text of Fahrenheit 451 book and scrolled to random pages to found some of the following examples of alliteration.  Ray Bradbury was a master at using figurative language and literary devices in his writing.  Note how the sentence sounds when you read it and what mood is being created by the repetition of the sound.

Here are some examples:

“It’s fine work.  Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn ‘em to ashes.  That’s our official slogan. 

“It was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set.”

“The little mosquito-delicate dancing hum in the air, the electrical murmur of a hidden wasp snug in its special pink warm nest.”

“The rain was thinning away and the girl was walking in the centre of the sidewalk with her head up and the few drops falling on her face

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What are two examples of alliteration in Fahrenheit 451 with page numbers?

Ray Bradbury uses alliteration throughout the book. Sometimes he uses it to convey high emotion and tense situations, and other times, he uses it as a poetical device to help the flow of the writing.

You can find the first examples as early as the first page when the author uses alliteration to convey the excitement Montag feels while he burns books:

Blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. (3)

Bradbury further conveys this good feeling as Montag is leaving work:

At the last moment, when disaster seemed positive, he pulled his hands from his pockets and broke his fall by grasping the golden pole. (4)

He emphasizes this feeling of joy even further as Montag starts his walk home:

He walked out the of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent air-propelled train slid soundlessly. (4)

As well as showing joy, one can also use alliteration to heighten tension. Notice how in this example, the words beginning with s really jump out at you:

Before he reached the corner, however, he slowed as if a wind had sprung up from nowhere, as if someone has called his name. (4)

In this context, Bradbury can drop the use of alliteration altogether to show a change in mood:

He had felt that a moment prior to his making the turn, someone has been there. (4)

The lack of alliteration in this sentence gives the impression that he's no longer sure of what's happening. Although in the following few pages he doesn't drop alliteration altogether, Bradbury uses it less as Montag begins to talk to the girl. This expresses how cautious and unsure he is of her.

On page 24, the author uses alliteration to emphasize the danger of the Mechanical Hound:

The Mechanical Hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live in its gently humming, gently vibrating, softly illuminated kennel back in a dark corner of the firehouse. (24)

Sometimes alliteration can be as simple as repeating words. In these following two examples, the author repeats the words "talked," "inch," and "face" to express how Montag feels about his wife being killed:

He saw her leaning toward the great shimmering walls of color and motion where the family talked and talked and talked to her... said nothing of the bomb that was an inch, now a half-inch, now a quarter inch from the top of the hotel. (159)

Montag, falling flat, going down, saw or felt, or imagined he saw or felt the walls go dark in Millie's face, heard her screaming, because in the millionth part of time, she saw her own face, heard her screaming, because in the millionth part of time left, she saw her own face reflected there. (159)

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What are two examples of alliteration in Fahrenheit 451 with page numbers?

When looking at Ray Bradbury's overall body of work, as a writer he tends to favor a very poetic kind of prose: richly descriptive, metaphorical, and imagery-intensive. With that in mind, when looking towards Farenheit 451, you should not be surprised to find there's a lot of alliteration within the book. Far more than two examples.

Actually, I'd start by noting the titles of the chapters. Of those three sections, two of them are alliterative. The second chapter is entitled: "The Sieve and the Sand" (note the repetition of the S sound) and the final chapter is titled "Burning Bright." In addition, you can see alliteration in the name of some of his characters. We see in chapter 1, Montag meet a teenager named Clarisse McClellan, and later, in chapter 2, we find hear mention of a presidential candidate named Hubert Hoag.

For two final examples, taken from the book's prose, I'd point first towards the book's opening page, where we read: "his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history." (Farenheit 451 1). Notice the specific sequence of blazing, burning, and bring-down, all in close proximity.

Just a few pages later, when Montag first encounters Clarisse, the narration tells us "her head was half bent to watch her shoes stir the circling leaves" (3)—here again we see the use of alliteration, first of the "h" sound, and then of the "s." Keep in mind, both of these examples are drawn from the book's first few pages. Alliteration is a frequent tool Bradbury employs.

As a final note, be aware that there are different editions of Farenheit 451, so the page numbers will vary depending on which one is employed. For this answer, I've consulted the Sixtieth Anniversary Paperback Edition, published by Simon & Schuster, 2013.

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What are two examples of alliteration in Fahrenheit 451 with page numbers?

Alliteration occurs when the same consonant is used more than once at the beginning of words in close proximity. My examples both come from chapter 1.

An example of alliteration occurs a few pages into the first chapter. Montag has just finished his first, startling, conversation with Clarisse. He walks into his dark house and dark bedroom. The room is described as follows:

It was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set.

This conveys what a cold contrast it is to return home after his vibrant encounter with Clarisse. But the word "mausoleum" also foreshadows what Montag will soon discover: that Mildred has attempted suicide. The alliteration in the line occurs in the repetition of "m" sounds: "marbled," "mausoleum," and "moon."

A few paragraphs later, Bradbury again uses alliteration, this time to describe Mildred's body when Montag finds it after she has overdosed on pills:

The breath coming out of the nostrils was so faint it stirred only the furthest fringes of life, a small leaf, a black feather, a single fibre of hair.

Here, the alliteration comes from the repeated "f" sound in "faint," "furthest," "fringes," "feather, "fibre."

Bradbury is a lyrical writer, whose gift is his ability to incorporate poetic techniques into his prose, so it should not be difficult to find examples of alliteration in this novel.

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What are two examples of alliteration in Fahrenheit 451 with page numbers?

For the page numbers to be meaningful, we need to be using the same edition. Mine is the Del Ray Book published by The Random House Publishing Group, 1991. If you use another edition, the pages may or may not align, so I will provide additional detail to help orient you.

In the section entitled "The Hearth and the Salamander," on page 4, Montag walks out of the fire station and heads for the subway.  Here we find a run of alliteration with sibilant "s" sounds that serve to suggest the sound of a hissing fire and associate it with the protagonist:

"He walked out of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent air-propelled train slid soundlessly..."

In the same section, on page 8, Montag, a burner of books, recites to Clarisse his "official slogan," a burning schedule of poets and novelists presented as alliterative couplets:

"Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner..."

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Discuss the use of alliteration in the beginning of Fahrenheit 451.

Alliteration is the repetition of initial sounds. It is used for literary emphasis and richness. Alliteration simply sounds appealing, and it helps authors focus readers' attention on important elements. That's why Ray Bradbury uses quite a lot of alliteration at the beginning of his novel Fahrenheit 451. Let's look at some examples.

In the novel's very first paragraph, we read that Montag's hands were the “hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.” Aside from being a creative metaphor, the quotation features some excellent b-alliteration. The same letter is used again a few paragraphs later when the man “hung up his black beetle-colored helmet.” The h also alliterates.

A couple paragraphs after this, Montag sees a girl. “Her dress was white and it whispered,” the narrator relates, using a w-alliteration that actually does whisper. As Montag speaks to the girl, he uses alliteration when describing his work: “Monday burn Millay, Wednesday, Whitman, Friday, Faulkner.” The girl, as she speaks, mentions “the man in the moon” with its m-alliteration. As Montag thinks about the girl, he reflects on the “incredible power of identification” she has and how she watched “each flick of a finger.” He does not understand her.

A while later, when Montag finds that his wife has overdosed on sleeping pills, he thinks about the machine that slides down into her stomach. “Did it drink of the darkness?” he wonders. Notice the d-alliteration here. After she is treated, Montag notices that his wife's lips are “fresh and full of color.” The alliteration continues as the novel progresses, giving readers a linguistic treat as they pursue a dark story.

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