"From Wine What Sudden Friendship Springs"

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Last Updated on January 19, 2017, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 190

Context: This satire was intended for "a Country Gentleman" whose identity is unknown. The poet tells of a king who found out the truth about his courtiers and ministers when he lost his way during a hunt and had to spend the night with a cottager in the countryside. Then...

(The entire section contains 190 words.)

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Context: This satire was intended for "a Country Gentleman" whose identity is unknown. The poet tells of a king who found out the truth about his courtiers and ministers when he lost his way during a hunt and had to spend the night with a cottager in the countryside. Then the story of the king is applied to a country squire who keeps a cur named Yap. The dog is insolent, and the squire loses the friendship of all his tenants and neighbors, till one day the dog disappears for a while, chasing a bitch in heat, and a neighbor tells the squire the cause of his isolation. This quotation is from the first part of the satire, which tells how the king, Antiochus, having lost his way, finds shelter with one of his Parthian subjects. Not knowing the identity of his guest, the cottager feeds and shelters the stranger; over food and drink the peasant speaks frankly:

The Parthian clown brought forth his best.
The king, unknown, his feast enjoy'd,
And various chat the hours employ'd.
From wine what sudden friendship springs!
Frankly they talk'd of courts and kings.

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