Emma Chapters 12-15 Questions and Answers

Jane Austen

Chapters 12-15 Questions and Answers

Study Questions
1. What does Emma do to soften Mr. Knightley’s attitude toward her when he comes to their house?

2. How much older is Mr. Knightley than Emma?

3. Why was Mr. Woodhouse especially agitated by his son-in-law’s harsh words about Mr. Perry?

4. Why did Harriet wish to return to her boarding school when she became ill?

5. How does John Knightley characterize Mr. Elton?

6. Why does Emma feel drawn to Frank Churchill?

7. How does Mrs. Weston characterize Mrs. Churchill?

8. How does Mr. Elton characterize Emma?

9. Why is Emma so concerned when Mr. Elton joins her in the carriage?

10. What makes their tête-à-tête even more awkward?

Answers
1. She takes her baby niece and bounces her on her knee, certain that Mr. Knightley would be moved by such a domestic picture.

2. He is sixteen years her senior and uses that fact to suggest that his experience gives him superior judgment.

3. He had been unconsciously attributing opinions and health theories to Mr. Perry that were, in fact, his own.

4. She wants to be taken care of by Mrs. Goddard, though Emma takes advantage of this opportunity to visit her and reassure her that Mr. Elton will be depressed when he learns she won’t be able to attend the party.

5. When they are alone, he tells her that Mr. Elton is a rational and unaffected man, except when there are ladies present and he tends to lose control.

6. Though she has vowed never to marry, the idea of Frank Churchill appeals to her. She judges him her equal in age, class, and character, though she has never met him.

7. She confides to Emma and Isabella that Mrs. Churchill rules over everyone at their estate of Enscombe, and she is an “odd-tempered woman.”

8. He tells Mrs. Weston how selfless Emma is in thinking only of Harriet’s health and his own, without concern for hers.

9. She dreads being alone with him because he has been drinking and is certain he will talk nonsense.

10. Her father is so concerned about the light dusting of snow on the ground, he has instructed the coachman to drive at a snail’s pace, giving them even more time alone.