Further Reading

Download PDF Print Page Citation Share Link

Last Updated on February 4, 2016, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 511

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Briggs, Jr., W. W. “A Bibliography of Virgil's Eclogues (1927-1977).” Principat, edited by Wolfgang Haase, pp. 1267-1357. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1981.

Extensive bibliography listing published text and commentaries; translations in seventeen languages; indices; manuscripts; general studies; sources; individual Eclogues ; contemporary and later ancient authors; Medieval, Renaissance,...

(The entire section contains 511 words.)

Unlock This Study Guide Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this The Eclogues of Virgil study guide. You'll get access to all of the The Eclogues of Virgil content, as well as access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

  • Summary
  • Critical Essays
  • Analysis
Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Briggs, Jr., W. W. “A Bibliography of Virgil's Eclogues (1927-1977).” Principat, edited by Wolfgang Haase, pp. 1267-1357. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1981.

Extensive bibliography listing published text and commentaries; translations in seventeen languages; indices; manuscripts; general studies; sources; individual Eclogues; contemporary and later ancient authors; Medieval, Renaissance, and modern authors; and textual criticism.

CRITICISM

Berg, William. Early Virgil. London: The Athlone Press, 1974, 222 p.

Includes the text and translation of Vergil's Eclogues, as well as interpretation and criticism of the individual poems.

Currie, H. MacL. “The Third Eclogue and the Roman Comic Spirit.” Mnemosyne XXIX, No. 4 (1976): 411-20.

Analyzes the use of the conundrum, or riddle, within the poem, observing that the use of such devices was common in the Italian comic tradition.

Galinskiy, G. Karl. “Vergil's Second Eclogue: Its Theme and Relation to the Eclogue Book.” Classica et Mediaevalia: Revue Danoise De Philologie et D’Histoire XXVI, No. 1-2 (1965): 161-91.

Maintains that none of the Ecloguesis “typical,” and examines the theme, structure, and relation of the second Eclogue to its Theocritean counterpart.

Kidd, D. A. “Imitation in the Tenth Eclogue.” Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 11, No. 9 (1964): 54-64.

Examines the imitative nature of the poem, arguing that the imitation is quite developed, subtle, and complex, and that the pattern of imitation is different in each of the four parts of the poem.

Leach, Eleanor Winsor. Vergil's “Eclogues”: Landscapes of Experience. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1974, 281 p.

Book–length study of the poems, focusing on the Roman view of the pastoral, symbolism in the first Eclogue,characterization in the rustic poems, and the use of prophecy within the poems.

Lee, Guy. “A Reading of Virgil's Fifth Eclogue.” Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, No. 203 (1977): 62-70.

Analyzes characterization and dramatic progression within the poem.

Nisbet, R. G. M. “Virgil's Fourth Eclogue: Easterners and Westerners.” Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, No. 25 (1978): 59-78.

Examines the analogies between religions of the East and Western tradition.

Otis, Brooks. “The Young Virgil.” In Virgil: A Study in Civilized Poetry, pp. 97-143. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963.

Offers an overview of Vergil's early works and the sources from which he may have drawn to compose such poetry.

Rudd, Niall. “Architecture: Theories about Virgil's Eclogues.” In Lines of Enquiry: Studies in Latin Poetry, pp. 119-44. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976.

Studies the structure of the Eclogues as a whole, rather than focusing on the structure of the individual poems.

Segal, Charles Paul. “Vergil's Caelatum Opus: An Interpretation of the Third Eclogue.” American Journal of Philology LXXXVIII, No. 3 (1967): 279-308.

Examines the third Eclogueand argues that it is not a “pure and simple” pastoral, but that in it Vergil highlights the limits of the pastoral form.

Wormell, D. E. W. “The Originality of the Eclogues: Sic Paruis Componere Magna Solebam.” In Virgil,edited by D. R. Dudley, pp. 1-26. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1969.

Studies the relationship between Theocritus's Idylls and Vergil's Eclogues,stating that the debt Vergil owes Theocritus is “almost incalculable.”

Additional coverage of Vergil's life and career is contained in the following source published by the Gale Group: Poetry Criticism,Vol. 12.

Illustration of PDF document

Download The Eclogues of Virgil Study Guide

Subscribe Now
Previous

Criticism