Dime Novels Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Anglo, Michael. “Gothic Foundations.” In Penny Dreadfuls and Other Victorian Horrors, pp. 11-29. London: Jupiter Books, 1977.

Surveys the subject matter of early dime novels and explores the genre's roots in Gothic fiction and in the social conditions of early nineteenth-century England.

Hoppenstand, Gary. “Introduction: The Missing Detective.” In The Dime Novel Detective, edited by Gary Hoppenstand, pp. 3-4. Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1982.

Argues that through analysis of dime novels a new type of detective character, the “Avenger Detective,” emerges.

Johannsen, Albert. “Authors, Artists, and Readers.” In The House of Beadle and Adams and Its Dime and Nickel Novels: The Story of a Vanished Literature, pp. 7-11. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1950.

Examines the identities of the authors and illustrators of dime novels.

Kent, Thomas L. “The Formal Conventions of the Dime Novel.” Journal of Popular Culture 16, No. 1 (Summer 1982): 37-47.

Examines the common literary devices and structures found throughout dime novels.

Noel, Mary. “Dime Novels.” American Heritage: The Magazine of History VII, No. 2 (February 1956): 50-5, 112-13.

Suggests reasons for the immense popularity of dime novels.

Pearson, Edmund Lester. “With, Ho! Such Bugs and Goblins.” In Books in Black or Red, pp. 129-39. New York: Macmillan Company, 1923.

Examines the causes of public outrage against dime novels, arguing that the outcry was unwarranted.

Schulte-Sasse, Jochen. “Can the Disempowered Read Mass-Produced Narrative in Their Own Voice?” Cultural Critique, No. 10 (Fall 1988): 171-99.

Reexamines Michael Denning's scholarship on dime novels and class ideology.

Thompson, Charles Willis. “That Maligned Innocent, the Dime Novel.” New York Times Book Review (3 November 1929): 2.

States that contrary to public opinion, the original dime novels adhere to a strong moral order.

West, Mark I. “Not to Be Circulated: The Response of Children's Librarians to Dime Novels and Series Books.” Children's Literature Association Quarterly 10, No. 3 (Fall 1985): 137-39.

Describes the campaigns of nineteenth-century public librarians to prevent children from reading dime novels.