Death and the Compass Summary
by Jorge Luis Borges

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Death and the Compass Summary

In the short story "Death and the Compass," Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges presents an intricate murder mystery that is also a complex intellectual puzzle. In an unnamed and fictitious European city, three murders are committed at precise one-month intervals. All three victims are Jewish men, and in each instance a cryptic message is left with the corpse. Franz Treviranus, an inspector, offers quick, conventional explanations for the homicides, whereas Erik Lönnrot, an idiosyncratic detective who considers himself a “pure reasoner,” peers into the patterned aspects of the killings and suspects a far more sinister explanation for how they fit together.

The opening paragraph presents a conclusive but oblique précis for the mysterious happenings that are about to be presented. For readers encountering the story for the first time, however, its contents are indecipherable. After this, Borges begins his tale.

The first murder victim is Doctor Marcel Yarmolinsky, a Jewish scholar who is attending the Third Talmudic Congress at the Hôtel du Nord. He checks in on December 3 and is given a room opposite the Tetrarch of Galilee. He spreads out his books in the room and begins to study. In the late morning on December 4, he is found dead on the floor of his room with a deep knife wound in his chest. In his typewriter is a piece of paper inscribed with a sentence: “The first letter of the Name has been uttered.

Treviranus suggests that a burglar attempting to steal the Tetrarch’s jewels entered Yarmolinsky’s room by mistake, but Lönnrot is not convinced by this “possible, but not interesting” explanation. He packages up Yarmolinsky’s books to take home to study. Lönnrot spends days studying the books. When he is interrupted by a journalist, he does not want to discuss the murder and instead speaks about his study of the names of God. The journalist publishes a story that reveals Lönnrot’s peculiar avenue of investigation.

The second murder takes place on January 3 in a drab suburb on the western edge of the city. A dead man is discovered propped up against the door of a paint shop. He too has a deep knife wound in the chest. On the diamond-patterned wall of the shop, a message is inscribed in chalk: “The second letter of the Name has been written.” The dead man is identified as Daniel Simon Azevedo, a thief, thug, and informer.

The third murder takes place on February 3 on the east side of the city at a tavern called the Liverpool House, which is run by a man named Black Finnegan. Before the third murder occurs, a man who identifies himself as Ginsberg calls Treviranus and says that, in exchange for payment, he will give information about the two “sacrifices.” Treviranus traces the call to the Liverpool House and learns that a man named Gryphius has most recently used the phone. When Treviranus reaches the tavern, Gryphius-Ginsberg has seemingly been abducted. According to witness accounts, two people in harlequin attire got out of a car, greeted Ginsberg, exchanged words with him in Yiddish, accompanied him up to his room, and then came back down with Ginsberg staggering between them. They drove off with him towards the harbor, where one of the harlequins scrawled a message on a pier shed: “The last letter of the Name has been uttered.

Lönnrot arrives on the scene and immediately begins to study a book found in Gryphius-Ginsberg’s room. Treviranus and Lönnrot discuss the case as they walk away from the tavern. Treviranus suggests that the latest crime may be a “mock rehearsal.” But Lönnrot places great significance in an underlined passage in the book, which states that “the Hebrew day begins at sundown and lasts until the following sundown.” Lönnrot also attends to one of the words Ginsberg used over the phone: “sacrifices.”

On March 1, Treviranus receives an envelope containing a map and a letter. The map marks the three murder sites and traces an equilateral triangle between them. The...

(The entire section is 1,158 words.)