Why does Reverend Hale visit the prison in The Crucible?

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At the end of Act Three, Reverend Hale leaves the court in outrage. He has seen Abigail and the other girls' manipulation and has condemned the proceedings.

We discover at the beginning of Act Four that he is visiting the accused in jail. Reverend Parris says the following about his visitations:

Hear me. Rebecca have not given me a word this three month since she came. Now she sits with him, and her sister and Martha Corey and two or three others, and he pleads with them, confess their crimes and save their lives.

It becomes apparent that Reverend Hale has been begging the accused to confess. His earlier outrage and denunciation stem from his newfound belief that the girls are, and have been, misleading the court. He has witnessed their deceit firsthand, and he now believes that he can save those who have been condemned. Furthermore, he seems to feel guilty for having been involved in an injustice.

Reverend Hale has, from the outset, been a firm believer that the Devil is afoot in Salem. He has made it his duty to root out those who have been corrupted by Satan. Now, however, it appears that he also wants to atone for his guilt in having had so many brought before the court. It seems, though, that his efforts have been largely unsuccessful. He reports that Rebecca Nurse, Martha Corey, and others cannot be driven to confess.

You must pardon them. They will not budge. 

Judge Danforth refuses to grant them a pardon. He believes that it will be unjust because twelve people have already been hanged. He also refuses Reverend Hale's request for more time. Hale's continued attempts at getting Judge Danforth to understand the desperate situation in the town are all to no avail, and Judge Danforth asks him why he has returned to the court. The Reverend's anguish is pertinently displayed when he cries out:

Why, it is all simple. I come to do the Devil’s work. I come to counsel Christians they should belie themselves... There is blood on my head! Can you not see the blood on my head!!

In the end, those who Reverend Hale so desperately tries to save are all put to death.

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To his credit, Reverend Hale has changed his mind about the truth of the accusations of witchcraft in Salem.

Hale embodies many of the moral contradictions of the play: he is a man of integrity who, although at times misguided and overzealous, is willing to change his mind when confronted with the truth.

In the end, Hale no longer believes that the claims made by Abigail and the other girls are true. In response to this he removes himself from the court and its proceedings in Salem. 

When he returns to Salem and goes to the prison it is to redeem himself, to attempt to avoid an uprising against the injustice of the court and to save John Proctor from death. 

He tells Elizabeth Proctor:

I would save your husband's life, for if he is taken I count myself his murderer. 

Hale fails in his attempts to persuade the court (Danforth and Hathorne) to postpone the carrying out of Proctor's sentence. 

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In The Crucible, why does Rev. Hale come to Salem?

At the beginning of the play, there are rumors of witchcraft spreading throughout Salem's community, and Reverend Parris's daughter is incapacitated, which is both puzzling and disheartening to her father and the community. When Susanna Walcott enters the scene, she brings back word from Doctor Griggs concerning Betty's perplexing condition. Susanna tells Reverend Parris that the doctor cannot find any cure in his extensive library that will help Betty and suggests that Parris look to "unnatural things" as the cause of her illness. Reverend Parris then tells Susanna to inform Doctor Griggs that he sent for Reverend Hale from Beverly to investigate the possibility of witchcraft. Reverend Hale is a relatively young intellectual, who is an educated specialist in the dark arts and anything concerning the "invisible world." Reverend Hale arrives at the beginning of the play to investigate and discover the source of witchcraft throughout the community. Despite Proctor and Rebecca Nurse's warnings, Reverend Hale begins his investigation and hysteria quickly spreads throughout Salem. 

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In The Crucible, why does Rev. Hale come to Salem?

Reverend Hale has come to Salem to provide some help or insight into the problem of the perceived possession of the girls.  He enters as a learned individual, a man of letters and someone who has the credibility as both a trained professional and outsider into the town's issues.  Hale is zealous about his "first call," and Miller describes him as such:  "His painfully acquired armory of symptoms, catchwords, and diagnostic procedures is now to be put to use at last."  He is excited about the opportunity to provide "goodness and its preservation" to the people of Salem.  At the same time, he is almost anticipating a "bloody fight with the Fiend himself."  

It is in this light where Hale comes to Salem.  It has become clear that there is an issue with the Devil in Salem and Hale wants to be a part of the solution to the problem.  This being his first assignment, he approaches it with much in way of anticipation and excitement.  For Hale, this is the chance of a lifetime.  His entry into Salem is conceived out of goodness and the belief that he is doing "God's work."  He enters Salem on the side of the prosecution.  As the drama unfolds, it becomes clear that his own certainty and maintaining it is his own crucible.

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In The Crucible, Why did Hale returned to Salem?

Reverend Hale has a huge background in demonology and witch-hunting, so he is a sought-after expert right from the start. However, Hale is a very dynamic character in the story. At first, he starts off blinded by his own self-confidence. Then he slowly becomes broken into the reality of what really was going in the village. At the end, he was in deep desire of redeeming himself from whatever harm his expertise may have added to the havoc of the village.

As Hale sees the the shady nature of the issue in the village, his self-confidence begins to shatter, and his guilt begins to increase. He goes in a journey of soul-searching, and realizes that the only way to fix things would be to make up for what he may have enabled: To make all the people that he enabled to accuse others to recant their accusations, and try to save those who are now condemned to die. Moreover, he wanted to make witches confess to save them from hanging, although at times he was actively encouraging them to lie. He particularly was feeling guilty for Rebecca Nurse and John Proctor.

Upon being asked why he is back, his answer was

Hale: "Why, it is all simple. i come to do the devil's work. I come to counsel Christians they should belie themselves. There is blood on my head! can not see the blood on my head!!"

However, he is unable to make the people do as he wanted. People would not confess nor believe the promise of being saved by confession. At the end of chapter 4, he does his last attempt at saving his own grace by begging Elizabeth to tell Proctor to change his mind, to no avail. The fact that he even utters the words:

What profit him to bleed? Shall the dust praise him? Shall the worms declare his truth?

Shows that we no longer do we have the boisterous and righteous Hale, but a man that no longer obeys and follows the system. Hence, chapter 4 is the summation of Hale's changes.

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Why is Reverend Hale summoned to Salem village in The Crucible?

Reverend Hale has been summoned to Salem to investigate the accusations of witchcraft.

In this play, Puritans take witchcraft very seriously.  They believe in it, or at least most of them do, and they fear it.  Reverend Hale is the person to call if you suspect there are witches in your midst!  Salem's preacher, Reverend Parris, sends for him when he realizes that he is out of his league.

Parris, his eyes going wide: No - no. There be no unnatural cause here. Tell him I have sent for Reverend Hale of Beverly, and Mr. Hale will surely confirm that.  Let him look to medicine and put out all thought of unnatural causes here. There be none. (Act 1)

Reverend Hale will supposedly investigate and determine if there is witchcraft afoot.  He is from Beverly, and “has much experience in all demonic-arts.”  This includes finding a witch in Beverly.  You can tell by the description of him that he really loves witch-hunting.

Mr. Hale is nearing forty, a tight-skinned, eager-eyed intel-lectual. This is a beloved errand for him; on being called here to ascertain witchcraft he felt the pride of the specialist whose unique knowledge has at last been publicly called for. (Act 1)

Reverend Hale thinks that the Devil is “wily.”  Proctor tells Hale that he has heard Hale is a sensible man, and he hopes that he will talk some sense into people.  Hale tries to do the right thing, but Salem is swept into hysteria.  It is hard to separate the truth from the fiction.  Hale does his best to determine if there is something really there, but ends up succumbing to the general consensus.

Being an expert on witchcraft, Hale is out of his element in Salem.  There are accusations abound from people who seem credible.  Unlike the one witch in Beverly, Salem is crawling with supposed witches.

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In The Crucible, why has Hale come to Salem?

The Crucible by Arthur Miller is based on the occurrences in Salem, USA in the seventeenth century. The community is steeped in superstition and easily persuaded that evil pervades their town when the minister's daughter, Betty Parris and her cousin, Abigail Williams, are caught dancing naked in the forest, a "sinful" activity. The girls, so as not to get into trouble, invent an elaborate plan to suggest that they are not responsible for their actions and have in fact been influenced by witches and are possessed. The townspeople believe these claims and, with their own agendas and need for retribution for their own unrelated problems, become involved in a web of intricate lies and assumptions which create an unmanageable situation. The Reverend Parris, Betty's father, sees an opportunity to create a name for himself and re-establish his authority in the town and, after the girls have provided the names of those so-called "witches," the town prepares to try and convict them. The crimes are punishable by hanging and the situation is, therefore, untenable as, even those who defend the accused are then also implicated and many innocent people are sentenced to hang.

The Reverend John Hale, "a specialist" in exposing witchcraft, comes from Beverly, a nearby town, at Reverend Parris's request, to officiate at the trials. He is tasked with establishing the connection to witchcraft and to expose the truth. He is considered an expert because he has studied its origins and even convicted a witch in his own town. He is excited to face "the Fiend himself." 

Eventually, however, recognizes the injustice. He begins to doubt the truth of the trials and, when Proctor is found guilty, he is tormented. He does try to find a way to change the outcome but is, however, not influential enough to make a difference, despite his expertise and knowing that the accused are not guilty. Matters have gone too far. 

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Why is Reverend Hale in Salem?

When the doctor can not figure out what is wrong with Betty, the others begin to argue about whether her condition is the effect of witchcraft. We begin to see people taking sides here: those who believe (or want to believe) that witchcraft is to blame and those who would rather use more logical means of finding out the problem. Parris has sent for Hale. Parris is convinced that Hale will confirm witchcraft exists in Salem because Hale has been through this before: "He has much experience in demonic arts . . ." 

Putnam basically demands that when Hale arrives, they should use his arrival to look for signs of witchcraft. Putnam's mind is made up. Proctor and others (Rebecca) are skeptical. In the paragraphs that introduce Hale to the reader, we learn that he had an encounter with a so-called witch but this turned out to be "a mere pest." Still, Hale believes witchcraft may exist and Parris intends to use Hale to support the view that witchcraft is a problem in Salem. Hale is sent for because he is an authority on witchcraft. 

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Why is Reverend Hale in Salem?

Hale is in Salem because Parris has asked him to come. Hale is older and more experienced in identifying witchcraft.

Miller (in one of the many excerpts that interrputs the dialogue) writes that Hale was eager to come, it was "a beloved errand" and "he felt the pride of the specialist whose unique knowledge has at last been publicly called for."

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