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Parris calls in Reverend Hale in order to calm the fears of the townspeople in Salem (and to protect himself -- he fears being ousted by an enemy faction).  Rumors are already circulating quickly about his daughter Betty.  Some people are saying that she's possessed; others say that they saw her fly over a neighbor's barn.  Moreover, rumors are circulating about the reputation of his niece, Abigail, as well.  Parris is terrified that people will believe that witchcraft has infected his home, and, as Mrs. Putnam says, everyone will think that "It is surely a stroke of hell upon [Parris]."  He will lose all credibility if this rumor persists.  Therefore, Parris is desperate to get ahead of the hysteria and declare that there is no witchcraft in his house (or Salem), so he calls in a well-known expert, Mr. Hale, to confirm his view.  He believes, after all, that Hale will find no evidence of witchcraft, as he tells Putnam that calling Hale is "A precaution only." 

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Parris is nervous during the opening scene of The Crucible because his daughter is paralyzed. As the town's resident minister during the late 1600s, there is great fear that the daughter may be possessed. This would be a great problem for his reputation. In fact, his career could be ruined. Although it would be great to have a doctor just fix an illness, Reverend Hale of Beverly is a known expert on these issues. Calling him in can confirm that she isn't possessed. If by chance she is, then this Reverend Hale should be able to exorcize the demon possessing her because he already apparently healed another woman of this type of ailment.

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Why has Parris sent for Reverend Hale from Beverly?

Parris has sent for the Reverend Hale from Beverly because he has already handled a suspected case of witchcraft in his parish (though he eventually determined that the woman in question was nothing more than a pest) and because Hale is an acknowledged expert in the subject. Hale is, like Parris, a minister and a Harvard graduate, and has a greater reputation as a man of learning (the real John Hale wrote several influential works on witchcraft). John Proctor, upon meeting him, says that he has heard Hale is a sensible man.

Parris is obviously concerned about Betty and hopes Hale will be able to cure her, but he is also desperately worried about appearances, particularly the idea that the devil is present in his house (which, ironically, Hale actually encourages). He calls on Hale at least partly in order to be seen to be doing something about the rising hysteria in his parish, which he feels is threatening his position.

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Why might Parris refer to Reverend Hale as Mr. Hale?

Reverend Samuel Parris is not well-liked in the community of Salem, despite his position as their spiritual leader. Consequently, he is insecure. His insecurity drives him to try to exert more power and authority to compensate. Although he is responsible for inviting Reverend Hale to Salem to get to the bottom of what is plaguing the girls, his insecurity deepens when Hale arrives and takes charge of what should really be Parris's responsibilities. It is reasonable to think that Parris mistakenly thought that he would look like a wise leader for bringing in an expert consultant, but instead, he looks like a panicked and fearful weakling quickly relegated to the the sidelines. Reverend Hale has a reputation for being a witchcraft expert, and Parris quickly comes to view him as a rival. In calling him "Mr." instead of "Reverend," Parris is trying to downplay his rival's strength.

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